Tag: The Star-Ledger

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Philip Pearlstein’s “saucer of formalism”

The Montclair Museum’s retrospective of Philip Pearlstein’s work includes an award-winning artwork from high school, expressionist works of the 1950s, post-1961 female and male studio nudes, lesser-known landscapes and cityscapes, and a selection of portraits. Curator Patterson Sims spoke with The Star-Ledger’s art critic Dan Bischoff. “Philip told me, at […]

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Kirchner’s angular unhotties

I saw the Kirchner exhibition at MoMA yesterday, and found his use of jangly discordant color, combined with obsessively repetitive, diagonal brushstokes completely original and engaging. His daily practice involved drawing miles of linear, knotty pencil sketches, and the sketchbook display alone (he produced hundred of sketchbooks) is worth the […]

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On Jasper Johns at the Met

At artnet, Donald Kuspit suggests that Johns is a good avant-garde conformist, and that his gray is evocative of the “man in the gray flannel suit.” “Modernism was no longer a terra incognita of art when Johns entered its ranks, but an established phenomenon, if still a little risqué, at […]

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Toledo in Princeton

“El Maestro Francisco Toledo: Art from Oaxaca, 1959-2006,” organized by the Stanlee and Gerald Rubin Center for the Visual Arts at the University of Texas at El Paso. The Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, NJ. Through Jan. 6. Dan Bischoff reports in The Star-Ledger: “Toledo is a later generation modernist. […]

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The critics respond: What is painting?

‘What Is Painting?” curated by Anne Umland. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY. Through September 17 In New York Magazine Jerry Saltz writes his own narrative for the exhibition: “The revisionism of this show works partly because it is so seamless. Except for one or two cases—a generically […]

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What is painting?

‘What Is Painting?” The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY. Through September 17 In The Village Voice, R.C. Baker recommends the show: “This big, brightly didactic survey of painting movements since roughly 1965 feels a bit like the Astor Place Kmart—blocky white spaces filled with disparate goods of mixed […]