Tag: Peter Schjeldahl

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Peter Schjeldahl’s insouciance

In The New York Review of Books, Sanford Schwartz considers Peter Schjeldahl’s unique contribution to art criticism. “Schjeldahl addresses us in a conversational prose that moves from point to point with the speed and ease of some high-tech instrument. He is a writer whose colloquial approach masks both a rather […]

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Schjeldahl hurts David Bonetti’s feelings

St. Louis Post-Dispatch art critic David Bonetti has just finished reading Seven Days in the Art World, and he isn’t happy. “Rodney Dangerfield ain’t got nothin on me. I’m a loser, baby, so why don’t you kill me. At least that’s what The New Yorker’s art critic Peter Schjeldahl implies. […]

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Measuring Marlene Dumas

Roberta Smith on Marlene Dumas: “The consistency of this show suggests an artist who settled too early into a style that needs further development. Stasis is disguised by shifting among various charged subjects that communicate gravity in shorthand. Ms. Dumas’s painting is only superficially painterly. The photographic infrastructure is usually […]

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Miró Miró on the wall

The New Yorker’s Peter Schjeldahl on the Miró show at MoMA: “‘I want to assassinate painting,’ Joan Miró is reported to have said, in 1927. Four years later, the Catalan modern master elaborated, in an interview: ‘I intend to destroy, destroy everything that exists in painting. I have utter contempt […]

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Clement Greenberg vs. Harold Rosenberg

In The New Yorker Peter Schjeldahl reports that The Jewish Museum’s chief curator, Norman L. Kleeblatt, has focussed “Action/Abstraction” on the writers, interspersing paintings and sculpture with abundant texts, photographs, and memorabilia. “Film clips display the men’s differently impressive rhetorical panache: Greenberg is incisive and imperious, Rosenberg droll and oracular. […]

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Book review: Let’s See

In bookforum, Alan Gilbert reviews Peter Schjeldahl’s new book, Let’s See: Writings on Art from the New Yorker. “What makes Schjeldahl a pleasure to read is that he loves language as much as art. ‘An utterance that sounds good isn’t always right, but one that sounds bad is invariably wrong,’ […]