Degrees of decay and destruction at the Neuberger Museum

The Neuberger Museum presents work by artists who are taking a critical look at the state of the environment in “Future Tense: Reshaping the Landscape.” Conveying current global realities in images (mostly paintings) that range from depictions of true-life events to fictional narratives and biting satire, sixty artists show their concerns with a constellation of … read more… “Degrees of decay and destruction at the Neuberger Museum”

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Where the paintings are

“If you emerged from the Whitney Biennial wondering where all the painting went, don’t despair,” Karen Rosenberg informs us in the NY Times this morning. “An alternative view of the state of contemporary art can be found at the National Academy’s annual exhibition. This year’s show is a non-member affair (alternate years are members-only), which … read more… “Where the paintings are”

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The tip of a psychic iceberg at MoMA

In the NY Times Ken Johnson declares that “Glossolalia: Languages of Drawing” is the most exciting exhibition of drawings the Museum of Modern Art has produced in years. “Organized by Connie Butler, the museum’s chief curator of drawings, it presents a delightfully unpredictable mix of about 100 works by two distinct groups: self-taught outsider artists … read more… “The tip of a psychic iceberg at MoMA”

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NY Times Art in Review: Nelson, Mitchell, Rauch

“Dona Nelson: In Situ, Paintings, 1973-Present,” Thomas Erben, New York, NY. Through May 31. Roberta Smith: “There are many ways a New York museum could avoid merely validating the art market; one would be to surprise us all and give the New York painter Dona Nelson a survey. She has painted prolifically and innovatively for … read more… “NY Times Art in Review: Nelson, Mitchell, Rauch”

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Rauschenberg is dead

Robert Rauschenberg, the irrepressibly prolific American artist who time and again reshaped art in the 20th century, died Monday night of heart failure. He was 82. In The NY Times, Michael Kimmelman writes that Rauschenberg’s primary interest lay in the process, not the product. “The process — an improvisatory, counterintuitive way of doing things — … read more… “Rauschenberg is dead”

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Philip Guston’s stories

The Morgan Library & Museum presents the first major survey of Guston’s drawings in 20 years. Organized by the KunstMuseum Bonn, and the Staatliche Graphische Sammlung Munich, in cooperation with the artist’s estate, the show examines the importance of drawing throughout key periods of Guston’s career, from the mid-1940s to 1980. While Guston is primarily … read more… “Philip Guston’s stories”

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Small talk with Roberta Smith

In the NY Times, Roberta Smith notices that the galleries are full of small abstract painting lately.”Small may be beautiful, but where abstract painting is concerned, it is rarely fashionable. Big has held center stage at least since Jackson Pollock; the small abstractions of painters like Myron Stout, Forrest Bess and Steve Wheeler are mostly … read more… “Small talk with Roberta Smith”

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Modernist Joseph Solman dead at 99

“Joseph Solman, a painter who, with Mark Rothko and other modernists, helped shape American art as early as the 1930s and, into a new century, continued to paint in his studio above the Second Avenue Deli in New York, died on Wednesday at his home in Manhattan,” Michael Kimmelman writes in the NY Times obituary. … read more… “Modernist Joseph Solman dead at 99”

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Abts in heaven

New Museum is presenting the first major U.S. solo exhibition of paintings by London-based artist Tomma Abts (born Kiel, Germany, 1967). Abts creates surprising, small abstract paintings that are being touted as the antidote to the “florid figuration” that has dominated contemporary painting in recent years. In the NYTimes, Ken Johnson writes that Abts’s paintings … read more… “Abts in heaven”

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The utopian promise of Modernism at the Aldrich Museum

“Painting the Glass House: Artists Revisit Modern Architecture” presents 2-dimensional work that explores the architecture and utopian ideas of the modern period. “The artists are less interested in the built structures themselves and what it might feel like to be inside one, and more interested in the philosophy and idealism they represent,” curator Jessica Hough … read more… “The utopian promise of Modernism at the Aldrich Museum”

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