NY TImes Art in Review: Larissa Bates

In the NY Times, Karen Rosenberg wonders why Larissa Bates, whose small ink-and-gouache paintings are guys-only versions of Darger’s impish, militant Vivian Girls, wasn’t included in the Henry Darger show at American Folk Art Museum. “In the ‘MotherMen’ series, centaurlike creatures give birth in the woods. The ‘Lederhosen Boys,’ young scamps with chubby limbs and … read more… “NY TImes Art in Review: Larissa Bates”

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The meaning of making

In a recent NY Times art review, Roberta Smith lamented the fact that the current crop of artists seems to have opted out of skill-building courses like painting and drawing, replacing the direct connection to materials with theory and artspeak. Building a “density of expression,” she suggests, is learned not through reading theory, but through … read more… “The meaning of making”

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MoMA hires Ann Temkin as Chief Curator of Painting and Sculpture

In the NYTimes, Carol Vogel reports that the Museum of Modern Art has chosen one of its own curators, Ann Temkin, to succeed John Elderfield, who retired as chief curator of painting and sculpture in July. “Ms. Temkin said that one of her priorities would be to ‘change our viewers’ experience in many ways,’ especially … read more… “MoMA hires Ann Temkin as Chief Curator of Painting and Sculpture”

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Cotter declares recreated Knoebel installation authentic!

NY Times critic Holland Cotter made the trip up the Hudson this week to visit Dia: Beacon and reports that he has no problem with the 2008 recreation of the 1977 Imi Knoebel installation. “’24 Colors—For Blinky’ was in storage for some 30 years, and when it was finally retrieved, Mr. Knoebel decided that it … read more… “Cotter declares recreated Knoebel installation authentic!”

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Out on the Island: Knoebel, Rivers and Krasner

“Imi Knoebel: Knife Cuts,” Dan Flavin Institute, Bridgehampton, NY. Through October 12. Ben Genocchio reports in the NYTimes that Dia is featuring two Imi Knoebel installations, although his review is primarily focused on the one at the Dan Flavin Institute in Bridgehampton. “You notice the colors first: boundless, joyful, and leaping off the wall at … read more… “Out on the Island: Knoebel, Rivers and Krasner”

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NY Times Art in Review: Hopper, Ellis, “Constraction,” Pearlstein

“Edward Hopper: Etchings,” Craig F. Starr Gallery, New York, NY. Through Aug. 15. Ken Johnson: “Early in his career, when the demands of commercial illustration left him little time to paint, Edward Hopper turned to printmaking and produced some of the most moving and memorable graphic images in 20th-century American art. This small gem of … read more… “NY Times Art in Review: Hopper, Ellis, “Constraction,” Pearlstein”

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Chuck Connelly’s close up

Chuck Connelly, a rancorous Neo-Expressionist whose paintings were popular in the 80’s, is the subject of a new HBO documentary, “The Art of Failure: Chuck Connelly Not For Sale.” In the NY Times, Daniel E. Slotnick visits Connelly in his Philadelphia studio to chat with the painter about the film. “The interior of the rambling … read more… “Chuck Connelly’s close up”

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Kimmelman’s in Spain

Wouldn’t we all love to have Michael Kimmelman’s job? Today he reports from Madrid on The Prado’s exhibition, Goya in Times of War. Not only does he travel throughout Europe, but he chats with interesting artists. “The sculptor Richard Serra saw the Goya show recently and told me, with a kind of rapture, that he … read more… “Kimmelman’s in Spain”

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Secrets for posthumous success

Am I the only artist who loathes arranging studio visits with dealers? Apparently not. In the NY Times today Dorothy Spears writes about artists who may not have been good at cultivating dealers and collectors when they were alive, but now that they’re dead, galleries are happy to represent them. According to Spears, if you’re … read more… “Secrets for posthumous success”

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Field trip to Williamstown to contemplate the soft side

James McNeill Whistler: “Paint should not be applied thick. It should be like breath on the surface of a pane of glass.” Ken Johnson reports in the NY Times that Marc Simpson, the Clark Art Institute’s curator of American art, has gathered 41 paintings, dating from the 1870s to 1919, by 15 Americans for their … read more… “Field trip to Williamstown to contemplate the soft side”

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