Tag: NY Times

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NY TImes Art in Review: Larissa Bates

In the NY Times, Karen Rosenberg wonders why Larissa Bates, whose small ink-and-gouache paintings are guys-only versions of Darger’s impish, militant Vivian Girls, wasn’t included in the Henry Darger show at American Folk Art Museum. “In the ‘MotherMen’ series, centaurlike creatures give birth in the woods. The ‘Lederhosen Boys,’ young […]

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The meaning of making

In a recent NY Times art review, Roberta Smith lamented the fact that the current crop of artists seems to have opted out of skill-building courses like painting and drawing, replacing the direct connection to materials with theory and artspeak. Building a “density of expression,” she suggests, is learned not […]

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Out on the Island: Knoebel, Rivers and Krasner

“Imi Knoebel: Knife Cuts,” Dan Flavin Institute, Bridgehampton, NY. Through October 12. Ben Genocchio reports in the NYTimes that Dia is featuring two Imi Knoebel installations, although his review is primarily focused on the one at the Dan Flavin Institute in Bridgehampton. “You notice the colors first: boundless, joyful, and […]

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Chuck Connelly’s close up

Chuck Connelly, a rancorous Neo-Expressionist whose paintings were popular in the 80’s, is the subject of a new HBO documentary, “The Art of Failure: Chuck Connelly Not For Sale.” In the NY Times, Daniel E. Slotnick visits Connelly in his Philadelphia studio to chat with the painter about the film. […]

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Kimmelman’s in Spain

Wouldn’t we all love to have Michael Kimmelman’s job? Today he reports from Madrid on The Prado’s exhibition, Goya in Times of War. Not only does he travel throughout Europe, but he chats with interesting artists. “The sculptor Richard Serra saw the Goya show recently and told me, with a […]

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Secrets for posthumous success

Am I the only artist who loathes arranging studio visits with dealers? Apparently not. In the NY Times today Dorothy Spears writes about artists who may not have been good at cultivating dealers and collectors when they were alive, but now that they’re dead, galleries are happy to represent them. […]