NY Times Art in Review: Mickalene Thomas, Allan D’Arcangelo, Sarah Crowner

“Mickalene Thomas: She’s Come Undone!” Lehmann Maupin, New York, NY. Through May2. Roberta Smith: Yet there is a fast-food obviousness to these paintings. Their potpourri of contemporary precedents is too easily parsed: Kathe Burkhardt’s raw images of Elizabeth Taylor, Robert Colescott’s racial indiscretions and the decorative (often beaded) overkill of artists like Lucas Samaras, Lisa … read more… “NY Times Art in Review: Mickalene Thomas, Allan D’Arcangelo, Sarah Crowner”

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NY Times Art in Review: Leon Kossoff and Xylor Jane

“Leon Kossoff: From the Early Years, 1957-1967,” Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York, NY. Through March 28. Roberta Smith reports: This show is an informative treat. The early paintings of the British artist Leon Kossoff are not well known in this country. No American museum even owns one. Of the 10 works here, all but one … read more… “NY Times Art in Review: Leon Kossoff and Xylor Jane”

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Why doesn’t activist art reflect our complex reality?

In New York, Jerry Saltz suggests that activist artists like Martha Rosler should stop recycling the well-worn tropes from the 1960s, move beyond the simplistic polarities of earlier political art, and begin to address our complex, contemporary reality with deeper insight and more nuance. “In the late sixties, Martha Rosler became known for a so-so … read more… “Why doesn’t activist art reflect our complex reality?”

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Even Charlie Finch loves Chris Martin (but hates Chelsea)

“After Yale, Chris embarked on a haphazard journey of shows in galleries like John Good, Bernard Toale, Daniel Weinberg and Sideshow. A small band of devoted collectors followed him around, dropping a few dollars on the bright boy to keep him going. Gallery director Jay Gorney told me, ‘I am a HUGE Chris Martin fan.’ … read more… “Even Charlie Finch loves Chris Martin (but hates Chelsea)”

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Chris Martin’s dare at Mitchell-Innes & Nash

“Chris Martin,” Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York, NY. Through March 1. Chris Martin investigates color, form and texture, ranging from bold and graphic to gestural and expressionistic. The surfaces are often distressed or collaged with elements including shellacked Wonder Bread, broken vinyl records and papier mâché forms. Martin, thoroughly engaged with the history of abstraction, … read more… “Chris Martin’s dare at Mitchell-Innes & Nash”

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Alberto Burri: surgeon turned artist after WWII

“Alberto Burri,” Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York, NY. Through January 19. Alberto Burri (1915 – 1995) was born in Città di Castello, Italy. He earned a medical degree in 1940, before serving as a surgeon during World War II in North Africa where he was captured in 1943 by Allied troops and sent to the … read more… “Alberto Burri: surgeon turned artist after WWII”

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NYTimes art reviews: Franks, Frankfort, de Balincourt, Calame

“NATALIE FRANK: Where She Stops,” Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York, NY. Through Oct. 13. Martha Schwendener reports: “The real friction here comes from seeing a painter in her 20s exhibiting works in Chelsea that look like work you would see in traditionalist strongholds on 57th Street. The implication is that there’s something radical in Ms. … read more… “NYTimes art reviews: Franks, Frankfort, de Balincourt, Calame”

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David Godbold’s mirthless mirth

Ben Davis dissects David Godbold’s snarky exhibition in artnet today. “Contemporary art is universally irreverent, but most often none too funny. This observation is particularly striking when one considers the fact that a lot of it, particularly that inspired by Big Daddy Marcel Duchamp, owes its very being to the tropes of comedy — masquerade, … read more… “David Godbold’s mirthless mirth”

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