Summertime blues: Clark, Fagan, Carrigan, Dubicki, Hocker, and Samelson in Torrington

Contributed by Laurie Fendrich / To walk into an open art gallery during this COVID-caused gloaming of the art world is perhaps to catch a glimpse of dawn. That’s what it felt like to me, anyway, when a couple of weeks ago I visited the not-for-profit Five Points Gallery at the Five Points Center for … read more… “Summertime blues: Clark, Fagan, Carrigan, Dubicki, Hocker, and Samelson in Torrington”

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Finding Esphyr Slobdokina

Contributed by Peter Plagens / When the annual The Armory Show art fair—which takes place on the piers on the Hudson River in New York—rolled around in 2008, the recession was in full swing. Dealers were scared, and bargains (on an art-collector scale of things, of course) were there for the asking. I’ve always gone … read more… “Finding Esphyr Slobdokina”

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What good is abstract painting now?

Contributed by Laurie Fendrich / Without any bombs exploding or even a single shot fired, the world we knew before COVID has gone “poof.” Sure, buildings are intact; trees, grass and flowers still grow; the sky is blue; people walk on streets and drive cars. What’s disappeared, for who knows how long, is the ease … read more… “What good is abstract painting now?”

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Will Agnes Pelton Ever Get Her Due?

Contributed by Laurie Fendrich / Pause for a moment to pity the painter Agnes Pelton (1881-1961). While she was alive, she was mostly overlooked; after her death, she was still mostly overlooked. This spring was to have been Pelton’s big moment, for she was finally to move into the spotlight of the New York art … read more… “Will Agnes Pelton Ever Get Her Due?”

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Catalogue essay: Abstract Art Does Not Stop an Hour

Contributed by Laurie Fendrich / The works in “Uncharted: American Abstraction in the Information Age” are, for whatever their reliance on what we call “technology,” first and foremost abstract art. To allow ourselves to be distracted by any “Wow!” factor that might lurk in some of them because they employ modern technology, or to be … read more… “Catalogue essay: Abstract Art Does Not Stop an Hour”

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Moira Dryer: Satisfyingly complete

Contributed by Laurie Fendrich / Moira Dryer (b. 1957; d. 1992) was among the first painters in the 1980s and ’90s to reject minimalism and conceptualism and open things up for painting after what had seemed, to many critics and theorists, to be its endgame. These artists reintroduced references to life and experience, proudly showed … read more… “Moira Dryer: Satisfyingly complete”

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Invitation: Houses in Motion, a tectonic tremor

UPDATE: Saturday, November 23, 3 pm, please join us for “Ask the Artist,” where we will be yakking about the contemporary state of abstraction. Did you see Peter Halley’s show at Greene Naftali? Let’s discuss. If you haven’t been to Bushwick lately, you might want to head out to Theodore:Art to see “Houses in Motion,” a … read more… “Invitation: Houses in Motion, a tectonic tremor”

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Vija Celmins: To fix the image in memory

Contributed by Laurie Fendrich / Anyone walking out of the Vija Celmins retrospective that opened last week at SFMoMA thinking how good she is at copying things might just as well have stayed at Starbucks and googled her name on Wikipedia, where this dumber-than-dumb entry awaits: Vija Celmins is an acclaimed Latvian-American visual artist best … read more… “Vija Celmins: To fix the image in memory”

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Fiction: The Square Drawing [Laurie Fendrich]

Today marks the beginning of the Two Coats of Paint fiction column, a special summer section featuring short stories about artists, collectors, galleries, and other matters centered in the art world. Laurie Fendrich has contributed the first story, which is about a drawing that goes missing. NOTE: If you would like to  submit a short story, please send it to … read more… “Fiction: The Square Drawing [Laurie Fendrich]”

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Fiction: The Teddy Bears [Laurie Fendrich]

Our second installment of summer fiction is “The Teddy Bears,” an amusing short story written by artist and arts writer Laurie Fendrich  about a mid-career artist whose gallery closes unexpectedly. The story is loosely inspired by the one we posted last week, “The Unknown Masterpiece” by Honoré de Balzac. Fendrich thinks of “The Teddy Bears”  as a “fable of postmodern art” in … read more… “Fiction: The Teddy Bears [Laurie Fendrich]”

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