Tag: John Yau

Uncategorized

Squeak Carnwath: No ordinary objects

In the Contra Costra Times, Laura Casey reports that Squeak Carnwath’s paintings are not the type of creations you slap on your wall because they match the drapes. “Through pigment and canvas, they can cry out angry frustration. In her 1999 work ‘Promise,’ she scribbles vows to the viewer that […]

Uncategorized

Yau on Helen Miranda Wilson

In The Brooklyn Rail, John Yau suggests that Helen Miranda Wilson, whose show at DC Moore recently closed, has moved beyond the Americana references of her earlier abstract paintings, and, in the process, achieved something quite radical. “For just when nearly everyone thought that nothing more could be done with […]

Uncategorized

Yau on Schnabel: Pedestrian at best

In The Brooklyn Rail, John Yau compares Julian Schnabel to Jean Cocteau, another self-agrandizing artist who was a better filmmaker than a painter. “What aberration allows bad artists to make terrific films? Why is it that the clichés that make for turgid art become acceptable and engaging when they are […]

Uncategorized

Yau on Reed

“David Reed,” Max Protetch, New York, NY. Through Dec. 22. This is Reed’s fifteenth solo show with Max Protetch. In the Brooklyn Rail, John Yau defends Reed against critics’ who derogatorily label Reed an old-fashioned Color Field painter. “There are a number of reasons that I can think of as […]

Uncategorized

Mark Greenwold’s small-scale painterliness

“Mark Greenwold: A Moment of True Feeling 1997-2007,” D C Moore Gallery, New York, NY. through Nov. 10 (today).Mark Greenwold’s tiny paintings, which he works and reworks, can take up to a year to complete. He says spending so much time looking at and thinking about a single work is […]

Uncategorized

Whitfield Lovell receives a MacArthur genius grant

Whitfield Lovell’s critically acclaimed portraits have been in solo and group exhibitions at prestigious museums throughout the country, including the Seattle Museum of Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Whitney Museum, and the Metropolitan Museum. “Whitfield Lovell creates meticulously rendered, life-sized, charcoal portraits on such wooden objects as sections […]