Studio visit with Jill Levine

Contributed by Susan Wanklyn / For many years Jill Levine has explored the territory between painting and sculpture. Her pieces are constructed with Styrofoam shapes, covered with rigid wrap and modeling pastes, and painted with bright geometric forms and symbols. On the occasion of her solo at High Noon Gallery, we met in her studio … read more… “Studio visit with Jill Levine”

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Amanda Church: The contemporary gaze

Contributed by Adam Simon / One of the under-appreciated aspects of art viewing is the way that a given work establishes a certain relationship with a viewer. Mark Rothko famously claimed that “lots of people break down and cry when confronted with my pictures.” He may have been trying to fend off a formalist reading … read more… “Amanda Church: The contemporary gaze”

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Bobbie Oliver’s flood of associations

Contributed by Robin Hill / Stepping into Bobbie Oliver’s solo exhibition “Residuals” at High Noon triggers sensations of spaciousness, familiarity, and equanimity. Initially, the paintings invite narratives of how the residues of saturated, ultramarine pigment on canvas came to be, and to what genomes they belong — architecture, the body, the cosmos, the atmosphere, the petri dish? A flood … read more… “Bobbie Oliver’s flood of associations”

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Theresa Hackett: Melt down

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Climate change is in the air, so to speak. I recently finished binge-watching Fortitude, an ongoing British sci-fi series about a Norwegian research outpost in the Arctic. The permafrost has begun to melt, unleashing unexpected horrors including species-jumping bacteria and a dangerous buckling effect whereby layers of ice melt at … read more… “Theresa Hackett: Melt down”

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