Tag: Dan Bischoff

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Measuring Marlene Dumas

Roberta Smith on Marlene Dumas: “The consistency of this show suggests an artist who settled too early into a style that needs further development. Stasis is disguised by shifting among various charged subjects that communicate gravity in shorthand. Ms. Dumas’s painting is only superficially painterly. The photographic infrastructure is usually […]

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Kirchner’s angular unhotties

I saw the Kirchner exhibition at MoMA yesterday, and found his use of jangly discordant color, combined with obsessively repetitive, diagonal brushstokes completely original and engaging. His daily practice involved drawing miles of linear, knotty pencil sketches, and the sketchbook display alone (he produced hundred of sketchbooks) is worth the […]

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The art of Jersey

Presented by the Morris Museum, New Jersey Then & Now, traces New Jersey’s depiction in representational art from the 18th century through today. Dan Bischoff reports in The Star-Ledger that the show is actually pretty funny. “You could say the irony that seems to dominate much of contemporary art had […]

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On Jasper Johns at the Met

At artnet, Donald Kuspit suggests that Johns is a good avant-garde conformist, and that his gray is evocative of the “man in the gray flannel suit.” “Modernism was no longer a terra incognita of art when Johns entered its ranks, but an established phenomenon, if still a little risqué, at […]

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Toledo in Princeton

“El Maestro Francisco Toledo: Art from Oaxaca, 1959-2006,” organized by the Stanlee and Gerald Rubin Center for the Visual Arts at the University of Texas at El Paso. The Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, NJ. Through Jan. 6. Dan Bischoff reports in The Star-Ledger: “Toledo is a later generation modernist. […]

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The critics respond: What is painting?

‘What Is Painting?” curated by Anne Umland. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY. Through September 17 In New York Magazine Jerry Saltz writes his own narrative for the exhibition: “The revisionism of this show works partly because it is so seamless. Except for one or two cases—a generically […]