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Group Shows

Thinking beyond New York City

Contributed by Sharon Butler / During a quick tour of Vermont, I discovered Benjamin Ward’s new gallery Stella Quarta Decima, or SQD, on Main Street in Manchester. The gallery will feature artists, primarily from Vermont, who work outside the confines of the commercial art market.

Gallery shows

The upstate line

Contributed by Laurie Fendrich / “The Subject is The Line” at the Thompson Giroux Gallery in Chatham, New York, is a handsome, beautifully installed exhibition of the work of fourteen established artists.

Group Shows

A good long look, at Spencer Brownstone

Contributed by Jacob Patrick Brooks / As you walk into “Honoring the Dog-Legging Horizon” at Spencer Brownstone Gallery, something feels off. The sense is vague at first, but it becomes clearer as you alternate between hunching in close or backing up more than usual. The show is hung low, by about a foot, to encourage sitting down, and the work is well worth taking in fully.

Gallery shows

Scene + Sensoria

A regularly occurring project of capture, of both the social and aesthetic dimensions of the New York art world, towards an ecological understanding of the scene as a living coral reef; these sensorial guided tours of affect, chance, and embodied presence will be relayed as an artistic experience by Andrew Paul Woolbright

Solo Shows

Pam Glick’s code theory

Contributed by Jason Andrew / Artists often have generative strategies for jumpstarting a work. The AbExers’ had their automatism and the minimalists had their procedural arrangements. For her new paintings, on display at The Journal Gallery in their rotating “Tennis Elbow” series, Pam Glick seems to embrace both the automatic and the procedural.

Solo Shows

Andrew Cranston’s dazzling seduction

Contributed by Jacob Patrick Brooks / I try not to go to galleries alone. If I don’t have someone to moderate me and make sure that I spend an appropriate amount of time viewing work, I can speed through without sufficiently absorbing it, to my own detriment. Yet, even on my own, I was immediately captivated by Andrew Cranston’s deceptively quiet, soft paintings in his current show “Waiting for the Bell” at Karma.

Solo Shows

Alyssa Klauer’s queer phantasmagoria

Contributed by Patrick Neal / Is the detectable hand of the artist evidence of a unique creator, or is gesture mainly indicative of earlier painters’ touches, the ghosts of art history? More broadly, do we choose the course of our own lives or are they predestined? These thoughts about individual sensibility and personal agency occurred to me while viewing Alyssa Klauer’s fine, visually and intellectually energized solo show “Dare Me,” on view at Olympia on the Lower East Side.