Studio visit with Jill Levine

Contributed by Susan Wanklyn / For many years Jill Levine has explored the territory between painting and sculpture. Her pieces are constructed with Styrofoam shapes, covered with rigid wrap and modeling pastes, and painted with bright geometric forms and symbols. On the occasion of her solo at High Noon Gallery, we met in her studio … read more… “Studio visit with Jill Levine”

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N. Dash: More enervating than edgy

Contributed by Curtis Mitchell / The moment of entering a gallery opening – bright lights, convivial conversation, and walls and floor partially seen through conjoined bodies – is not conducive to thoughtful viewing. N. Dash’s paintings recently on display at Casey Kaplan, with their radically blown-up images of nubs of fabric and other household remnants, … read more… “N. Dash: More enervating than edgy”

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Catalogue essay: Elisabeth Condon’s flowers and the visionary impulse

Contributed by Jason Stopa / Some painting of the last decade presents itself as politically neutral, simply about aesthetic taste, and lacks any stakes. Others still are incredibly didactic, demanding the viewer agree with their sentiment as much as their surfaces. Somewhere in the nexus of this is a painting that acts as a container … read more… “Catalogue essay: Elisabeth Condon’s flowers and the visionary impulse”

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Invitation: Houses in Motion, a tectonic tremor

UPDATE: Saturday, November 23, 3 pm, please join us for “Ask the Artist,” where we will be yakking about the contemporary state of abstraction. Did you see Peter Halley’s show at Greene Naftali? Let’s discuss. If you haven’t been to Bushwick lately, you might want to head out to Theodore:Art to see “Houses in Motion,” a … read more… “Invitation: Houses in Motion, a tectonic tremor”

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Hermine Ford’s exquisite poise

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / Any painter is eclectic to a greater or lesser degree, drawing inspiration from other painters, but it’s a rarer one who successfully processes multiple discrete influences into distinctive art all her own. Hermine Ford is emphatically such a painter. Her discursively shaped paintings currently on view at the New York … read more… “Hermine Ford’s exquisite poise”

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Pat Passlof: At the apex of a leap

Contributed by Jason Andrew / This is first of three posts by Jason Andrew that discuss the work of Pat Passlof; the post takes a look at the survey curated by Karen Wilkin at the Milton Resnick and Pat Passlof Foundation, on view October 11, 2019 – April 2020; the second will examine the exhibition … read more… “Pat Passlof: At the apex of a leap”

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ICYMI: Elizabeth Hazan

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Elizabeth Hazan’s earlier paintings were highly resolved meditations on Google map imagery and aerial landscape views of Long Island’s east end. The terrific new work, recently on display at Johnannes Vogt in a solo show called “Heat Wave,” is moving into a less certain, but, for me, more satisfying state … read more… “ICYMI: Elizabeth Hazan”

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Amanda Church: The contemporary gaze

Contributed by Adam Simon / One of the under-appreciated aspects of art viewing is the way that a given work establishes a certain relationship with a viewer. Mark Rothko famously claimed that “lots of people break down and cry when confronted with my pictures.” He may have been trying to fend off a formalist reading … read more… “Amanda Church: The contemporary gaze”

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Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: November 2019

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Hello November! There are plenty of shows opening this month, and today (November 15) is also the fifteenth day of the 2019 Two Coats of Paint year-end fundraising campaign. This year we’re requesting funding to continue our work supporting artists and arts organizations through 2020. You might think of your … read more… “Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: November 2019”

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Hans Haacke’s ethical snark

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / If mid-century art lovers had thought Robert Rauschenberg’s cheeky erasure of Willem de Kooning’s drawing in 1953 was irreverent, they might have revised their definition of the term twenty years later, when Hans Haacke tendered them detailed questionnaires about their backgrounds and attitudes as they entered the John Weber Gallery, … read more… “Hans Haacke’s ethical snark”

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