Solo Shows

Solo Shows

Karin Davie’s new sense of self

Contributed by Sharon Butler/ At Chart, Karin Davie, in her first NYC show since 2007, has moved with elegant decisiveness from pop-inflected stripes, slapdash and dripping, to wide, sine-wave brushstrokes that gently oscillate in glowing geometric formations.

Solo Shows

Caroline Kent: A set of symbols

Contributed by Jonathan Goodman / Caroline Kent, a painter based in Chicago, is having her first show at Casey Kaplan. She makes schematic abstract paintings, which have aspects of doubled, mirror-like imagery. An underlying fiction of her art is the presence of twins, Victoria and Veronica, who speak to each other and to the painter’s audience via the works she creates. Kent’s sign-like abstraction involves a set of symbols whose meaning depends not on any explicitly prescribed content but rather on their visual orientation in terms of form and placement.

Solo Shows

Pam Glick’s code theory

Contributed by Jason Andrew / Artists often have generative strategies for jumpstarting a work. The AbExers’ had their automatism and the minimalists had their procedural arrangements. For her new paintings, on display at The Journal Gallery in their rotating “Tennis Elbow” series, Pam Glick seems to embrace both the automatic and the procedural.

Solo Shows

Andrew Cranston’s dazzling seduction

Contributed by Jacob Patrick Brooks / I try not to go to galleries alone. If I don’t have someone to moderate me and make sure that I spend an appropriate amount of time viewing work, I can speed through without sufficiently absorbing it, to my own detriment. Yet, even on my own, I was immediately captivated by Andrew Cranston’s deceptively quiet, soft paintings in his current show “Waiting for the Bell” at Karma.

Solo Shows

Alyssa Klauer’s queer phantasmagoria

Contributed by Patrick Neal / Is the detectable hand of the artist evidence of a unique creator, or is gesture mainly indicative of earlier painters’ touches, the ghosts of art history? More broadly, do we choose the course of our own lives or are they predestined? These thoughts about individual sensibility and personal agency occurred to me while viewing Alyssa Klauer’s fine, visually and intellectually energized solo show “Dare Me,” on view at Olympia on the Lower East Side.