Catherine Howe: Sly virtuosity

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Calling Catherine Howe’s whirling, monochromic flower paintings “the pleasure garden” is archly ironic, like calling de Kooning’s early paintings “women.” Although her canvases outwardly do describe floral forms, their deeper meaning lies in the large, threatening scale, the aggressively fluid use of materials, and the evident physical energy that went into their making. … read more… “Catherine Howe: Sly virtuosity”

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Two Pieros for Mary Hambleton

Contributed by Ken Buhler / One afternoon last summer I decided to go to the National Gallery in London. I was in upstate New York, idly turning the pages of a book of Italian paintings, when I came upon Piero Della Francesca’s Baptism. Its geometric perfection and its eloquence struck me full-on. The plan for the … read more… “Two Pieros for Mary Hambleton”

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William Powhida’s inquisition

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / For a while it looked as though William Powhida might be painting himself into an existential corner. His mission was to sensitize his audience to the hypocritical churn of the art market – to the reality that what made producing something putatively nobler and loftier than money viable was in fact … read more… “William Powhida’s inquisition”

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Studio Visit (at last) with Lucy Mink

Contributed by Jason Andrew / Lucy Mink was the first artist I came to know solely through Facebook. She didn’t live in Brooklyn but in rural Contoocook, New Hampshire, and I became cyber-obsessed, waiting for each new post from her studio. What I saw then and continue to see today in Mink’s work is an embrace of the kind … read more… “Studio Visit (at last) with Lucy Mink”

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Rachel Howard: A fascination with madness

Contributed by Sharon Butler / British painter Rachel Howard is in town this month, presenting “L’appel du vide,” her first New York solo show, at Blain|Southern. Howard is known for a visceral, intuitive approach to abstraction that embraces painting, sculpture, and work on paper. Last week, after she’d finished installing the show, she and her old friend (and Brooklyn gallerist) Stephanie … read more… “Rachel Howard: A fascination with madness”

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Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: September 2019

UPDATED / The number of painting shows in the September guide is truly impressive. Highlights include Loie Hallowell’s first solo show at Pace, Elizabeth Hazan’s debut at Johannes Vogt, and William Powhida’s first NYC solo in five years at Postmasters (also at Posmasters: Diana Cooper’s first solo there in six years). Lisson is presenting work by French painter Bernard Piffaretti, whom they now represent, … read more… “Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: September 2019”

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Interview: Sayaka Maruyama’s labyrinth of thoughts

Contributed by Emma Stolarski / I spotted New York-based Japanese artist Sayaka Maruyama’s memorandom 0 by chance on the growing art book collection of my former boss’s office shelves. On the cover, a vague image of in-progress notes and sketches prompted me to crack the spine, and from looking at the very first page I felt the familiar excitement for what … read more… “Interview: Sayaka Maruyama’s labyrinth of thoughts”

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Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: August 2019

In August it seems as if everyone is out of town, but a few galleries, such as Fisher Parrish, Equity Gallery, Karma, Sunroom Project Space at Wave Hill, and Art + Leisure,  are holding their shows over to September, and others are on view for another week or two. We’re looking forward to all kinds of new and interesting exhibitions in September, and … read more… “Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: August 2019”

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Post-exhibition shout-out: “We Woke Up This Way” at Sardine

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Despite our deep dive several years ago into Provisional painting and the Casualist tendency, a battery of questions continues to confront painters in the studio: can a painting be meaningful if the process involves fun rather than struggle? Is hard-earned resolution required? Or can something painted quickly and easily still qualify as good? At … read more… “Post-exhibition shout-out: “We Woke Up This Way” at Sardine”

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An artist’s notes: Christina Tenaglia

Images by Julie Torres, text by Christina Tenaglia / In addition to drawing and keeping sketchbooks, artists often take notes throughout the process of making their work. The notes published herein are from Christina Tenaglia, whose unabashedly human and thoroughly investigated work is on view at Thomas Parks Gallery through August 10.

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