Chris Domenick’s deceptively flat world

Contributed by Tony Bluestone / “Flat Moon,” Chris Domenick’s show of large framed works at Kate Werble Gallery, was the last exhibition I was able to see in person before the Covid-19 pandemic made it necessary to close galleries to the general public. The show is eerily poignant. Domenick asks how we know that the … read more… “Chris Domenick’s deceptively flat world”

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Anywhere Out of the World: Chagall and me

Contributed by Susan Bee / The early paintings of Marc Chagall are a recent inspiration. It’s a strange turn. For years I thought I disliked his work, especially the late paintings: too saccharine and repetitious. But I became enamored by his early efforts when I saw Chagall, Lissitzky, Malevich: The Russian Avant-Garde in Vitebsk, 1918–1922, … read more… “Anywhere Out of the World: Chagall and me”

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Catalogue essay: Abstract Art Does Not Stop an Hour

Contributed by Laurie Fendrich / The works in “Uncharted: American Abstraction in the Information Age” are, for whatever their reliance on what we call “technology,” first and foremost abstract art. To allow ourselves to be distracted by any “Wow!” factor that might lurk in some of them because they employ modern technology, or to be … read more… “Catalogue essay: Abstract Art Does Not Stop an Hour”

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Carolyn Case: Build battle sink

To see a World in a Grain of Sand And a Heaven in a Wild Flower… –William Blake Contributed by Andrew Woolbright / Carolyn Case has mounted a colorful swarm of pastels and paintings in her third solo show with Asya Geisberg Gallery, “Before It Sinks In.” The title is a wry double entendre on … read more… “Carolyn Case: Build battle sink”

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Robin Hill’s acts of unnaming

Contributed by Elizabeth Whalley / In a genre-defying practice, Robin Hill queries the nature of her sensory entanglements with the everyday world. Embracing a vast array of materials, playing with scale and dimensions, blurring modes of expression, she transforms her spontaneous encounters with substances and objects into mystifying, unnameable objects. Hill is a New York-based … read more… “Robin Hill’s acts of unnaming”

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Art and Film: Kelly Reichardt’s eye for grace

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / In the 1820s, not long after Lewis and Clark blazed the Oregon Trail, Otis “Cookie” Figowitz, a white orphan from Maryland who had been indentured to a Boston baker and is now a cook, and King-Lu, an itinerant Chinese dreamer on the run, are en route to Fort Tillicum, a … read more… “Art and Film: Kelly Reichardt’s eye for grace”

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Moira Dryer: Satisfyingly complete

Contributed by Laurie Fendrich / Moira Dryer (b. 1957; d. 1992) was among the first painters in the 1980s and ’90s to reject minimalism and conceptualism and open things up for painting after what had seemed, to many critics and theorists, to be its endgame. These artists reintroduced references to life and experience, proudly showed … read more… “Moira Dryer: Satisfyingly complete”

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Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: March 2020

This week the art fairs settle into their New York cubicles. Galleries, of course, also have a robust slate of offerings, which might be a welcome refuge especially for Warren and Sanders supporters who are licking their wounds after Super Tuesday and trying to wrap their minds around a general election featuring Uncle Joe and … read more… “Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: March 2020”

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Painting and the anti-Oedipal insurgency

Contributed by Andrew Woolbright / In 1972, Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari – a French philosopher and a French psychoanalyst, respectively – published Anti-Oedipus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia. It became something of an intellectual sensation. Among other things, they challenged Freud’s focus on the Oedipus complex as an irrepressible source of human aggression and regimentation. Michel … read more… “Painting and the anti-Oedipal insurgency”

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Art and Film: Dimitri de Clercq’s dark idyll

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / Not every filmmaker can emulate Alfred Hitchcock and cue Chet Baker in a feature debut shot on a shoestring budget and avoid appearing shamelessly trite or derivative, but Belgian director and co-writer Dimitri de Clercq pulls it off with his captivatingly twisted, noirish romance You Go To My Head. The … read more… “Art and Film: Dimitri de Clercq’s dark idyll”

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