Remote: Teaching art online

Contributed by Peter Plagens / Serious studio art classes cannot be taught online. Oh, they can be “taught”—if the professors and students accept, in a parallel to what my father used to say about cheap frozen pizza, a “cheese-like substance” in place of real cheese. That is, if everybody settles for an antiseptic virtual classroom … read more… “Remote: Teaching art online”

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Katherine Finkelstein: On scale, perspective, and upending expectation

Contributed by Luisa Caldwell / A few days before “Babybox” was scheduled to open at Motherbox gallery in Brooklyn, artist, gallery director, and curator Katherine Finkelstein sent out a notice that the show would be physically closed, but that she would be giving individual tours via iPhone. I was intrigued by the invitation, and, while … read more… “Katherine Finkelstein: On scale, perspective, and upending expectation”

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Conversation during lockdown: Alexis Granwell and Aubrey Levinthal

After back-to-back studio visits in late February, Philadelphia artists Alexis Granwell and Aubrey Levinthal started a digital conversation to follow up and ride out the isolation of the social-distancing lockdown. They discuss seismic studio shifts, tarot cards, rotten bananas, and working on the kitchen table. Aubrey Levinthal: Some artists say they feel freed by the … read more… “Conversation during lockdown: Alexis Granwell and Aubrey Levinthal”

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Quick study: How the world is changing

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Here are some articles and online projects that I thought might interest Two Coats readers. I’ve been somewhat productive in working on an artists’ book project during lockdown, but I have trouble tearing myself away from the news and trying to make sense of it all. George Packer wrote “We … read more… “Quick study: How the world is changing”

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Art and Film: Claustrophobia

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / People in lockdown on account of a pervasive but invisible biological enemy might be perversely drawn to movies broadly about pandemics, like Steven Soderbergh’s coolly wise Contagion (2011), Alfonso Cuarón’s elegantly melancholy Children of Men (2006), or the rather silly but occasionally unnerving Outbreak (1995). Some could also resort to … read more… “Art and Film: Claustrophobia”

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Piranesi and the anxiety of modernity

Contributed by Armin Kunz / Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720–1778) created innumerable views of ancient and modern (that is, Baroque) Rome that together formed his monumental print cycles “Antichità Romane” and “Vedute di Roma.” They established his fame and lured generations of travelers to the Eternal City. Today, however, he is best known for the series … read more… “Piranesi and the anxiety of modernity”

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Will Agnes Pelton Ever Get Her Due?

Contributed by Laurie Fendrich / Pause for a moment to pity the painter Agnes Pelton (1881-1961). While she was alive, she was mostly overlooked; after her death, she was still mostly overlooked. This spring was to have been Pelton’s big moment, for she was finally to move into the spotlight of the New York art … read more… “Will Agnes Pelton Ever Get Her Due?”

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Richard Rezac’s grand domesticity

Contributed by Rachel Youens / Richard Rezac, a Chicago-based sculptor, is having his first solo show at Luhring Augustine Chelsea. Rezac’s abstract sculptures are supra-sensual forms. His method of slow, deliberate decision-making yields a heightened sensuality that suggests many things at once. Standing on the floor or in corners, hung on walls at different heights, … read more… “Richard Rezac’s grand domesticity”

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Chris Domenick’s deceptively flat world

Contributed by Tony Bluestone / “Flat Moon,” Chris Domenick’s show of large framed works at Kate Werble Gallery, was the last exhibition I was able to see in person before the Covid-19 pandemic made it necessary to close galleries to the general public. The show is eerily poignant. Domenick asks how we know that the … read more… “Chris Domenick’s deceptively flat world”

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