Hans Haacke’s ethical snark

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / If mid-century art lovers had thought Robert Rauschenberg’s cheeky erasure of Willem de Kooning’s drawing in 1953 was irreverent, they might have revised their definition of the term twenty years later, when Hans Haacke tendered them detailed questionnaires about their backgrounds and attitudes as they entered the John Weber Gallery, … read more… “Hans Haacke’s ethical snark”

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Hello Instagram: Angela Lane in Berlin

Contributed by Giovanni Garcia-Fenech / I initially resisted Instagram, dismissing it as a repository of selfies, sunsets, and celebrities, but, soured by Facebook and Twitter, I finally joined. Over the past four years I’ve come to appreciate IG for introducing me to a lot of terrific artists, many of whom never show their work in … read more… “Hello Instagram: Angela Lane in Berlin”

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Art and Film: Joker is the wrong movie

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / Joker, Todd Phillips’ tensely anticipated origin story of the Batman villain that grossed $96 million in its first weekend, self-consciously presents as Taxi Driver meets The King of Comedy, and a kind of atavistic essay on the perils of inequality and the dominance of the one percent. Like many high-concept films, however, … read more… “Art and Film: Joker is the wrong movie”

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Looking back: Richard Baker at Tibor de Nagy

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Last month, seeing Richard Baker’s paintings from the 80s and 90s at Tibor de Nagy took me back to my early days in New York. I had arrived in Soho in 1987 after finishing a two-year stint studying painting at MassArt in Boston, where I made modest surface-oriented abstractions. In New York, … read more… “Looking back: Richard Baker at Tibor de Nagy”

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Assistants: Connected through circumstance

Contributed by Adam Simon / Lineage is not a concept with a lot of currency these days; too close, perhaps, to its more déclassé kissing cousin, tradition. We look to academia and art history to find precursors for artistic innovators. Typically, the presentation and criticism of art tend to focus on the artist as a … read more… “Assistants: Connected through circumstance”

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Amna Asghar: Plumbing orientalism

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / Amna Asghar’s gently captivating new paintings, on display at Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery on the Lower East Side, explore a rich variety of experiences and perceptions associated with the geographical movement or cultural displacement. Such a shift could be a matter of orderly emigration, traumatic upheaval, or impulsive wanderlust. Whatever its nature, … read more… “Amna Asghar: Plumbing orientalism”

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Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: October 2019

Contributed by Sharon Butler / This month, in addition to the ongoing impeachment inquiry, which seems to expand minute by minute, there are plenty of great exhibitions to see; I also have a few invitations to share. Please join us: Saturday, October 12, 4pm, I hope upstate readers can stop by the Woodstock Artists Association and … read more… “Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: October 2019”

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Ideas and influences: Mike Cloud

Rather than parse the differences among us, Mike Cloud’s new paintings address the one experience we all have in common regardless of race, gender, ethnicity, wealth, or nationality: impending death. For his solo show at Thomas Erben, on view through November 2, Cloud has used stretcher bars, belts, fabrics, paint, and other materials to create … read more… “Ideas and influences: Mike Cloud”

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Melissa Capasso: Good vibrations

Contributed by Jennifer Rose Bonilla-Edgington / It’s the visual vibrations, both from individual paintings and from the show as a whole, that first call the viewer to Brooklyn-based artist Melissa Capasso’s work, on view at Jennifer Wroblewski’s gallery Gold/Scopophilia in Montclair. Vibrant and predominantly abstract, Capasso’s small-scale paintings suggest beats of life flowing from one piece to the next.

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