Art and Film: Eva Hesse’s enduring disruption

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / Eva Hesse, as portrayed in Marcie Begleiter’s superlatively penetrating Eva Hesse, sadly but exquisitely zoned in on mortality as the paradoxical stuff of life and art. She was a vexed woman, her life a tragic mid-century opera. She escaped Nazi Germany as a two-year old with her sister Helen Hesse … read more… “Art and Film: Eva Hesse’s enduring disruption”

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Picks: Sharpe-Walentas Open Studios

Two years ago the Marie Walsh Sharpe Foundation Space Program joined forces with the Walentas Family Foundation, the philanthropic element of Two Trees Management Company (my landlord). Two Trees owns the Brooklyn building that houses the Sharpe Foundation, which since 1991 has provided free studio space to selected artists via one-year residencies. Over the years, … read more… “Picks: Sharpe-Walentas Open Studios”

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Art and film: David Hockney’s world

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / David Hockney, in Randall Wright’s rather breezy documentary Hockney (at Film Society of Lincoln Center, extended through June 2), appears to be a thoughtful hedonist, in thrall to beautiful moments. He admits to a fairly happy working-class childhood in Yorkshire and seems to have encountered relatively little friction over his … read more… “Art and film: David Hockney’s world”

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Jane Swavely: Admiration for the jungle

Contributed by Mira Dayal / There is a sense of unease in the series of paintings that comprise of “Espial,” Jane Swavely’s latest show at A.I.R. Gallery. I enter the space — not of the gallery, but of the painting itself. Hovering just inches above the ground, the edges of the canvas become the frame … read more… “Jane Swavely: Admiration for the jungle”

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Trudy Benson: Cheerfully kinetic, but…

In her solo show at Half Gallery, Trudy Benson presents easel-size paintings that continue her riff on the digital imagery of early paint software like MacPaint, SuperPaint, and Painter. Working in layers with pattern and line, and using saturated color, Benson creates abstractions that seem to jump off the canvas. Her paint handling is fun … read more… “Trudy Benson: Cheerfully kinetic, but…”

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Quick study

Links to Nicole Eisenman’s shows, Morley Safer’s paintings, reviews of recent abstraction shows, a writing competition, and the paintings being called “anti-Catholic” in Virginia –> MUST SEE: The New Museum has mounted a major Nicole Eisenman solo show, “Al-Ugh-Ories,” and she’s also having an exhibiton at Anton Kern through June 25. Both look fantastic. I’ll … read more… “Quick study”

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Blurring the boundary between painting and photography

For the exhibition “Chemistry: Explorations in Abstract Photography,” curator Karlyn Benson, director of Matteawan Gallery in Beacon, NY, has selected six photographers who push beyond traditional photographic processes in search of new definitions of what a photograph can be. In this exhibition, on display at Garrison Art Center  May 21 through June 19, process itself … read more… “Blurring the boundary between painting and photography”

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Ideas and Influences: Adam Simon

Adam Simon could best be described as a conceptual painter. Based in Brooklyn, he has been painting and organizing community projects like Four Walls and the Fine Art Adoption Network for more than 25 years. Lately, though, he’s put community projects aside to work in the studio, where his ironically elegant new abstract paintings riff … read more… “Ideas and Influences: Adam Simon”

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“Bill and Ted” at Freddy (new location)

The formerly mysterious Baltimore gallery Freddy has relocated to an old church in Harris, New York, a small town between Liberty and Monticello of Route 17. I recently received a press release from gallery director Joshua Abelow about the inaugural show, “Bill and Ted,” which features work by Bill Adams and Ted Gahl. Apparently Freddy … read more… ““Bill and Ted” at Freddy (new location)”

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