Weekend Report, Part 2: Wool, Belcourt, Ellison, Kane, Motherwell and more

 Following up on Part 1, Part 2 of my Weekend JPEG Report includes a trip to the Guggenheim to see the Christopher Wool 30-year retrospective, a little Kandinsky show, and Robert Motherwell’s early collages. Later I stopped by the open studios at 315 Berry Street in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, to check out new work by Louise … read more… “Weekend Report, Part 2: Wool, Belcourt, Ellison, Kane, Motherwell and more”

No Comments

The Weekend Report, Part 1: Beat Nite 9 in Bushwick, and the EFA Open Studios

Here’s a JPEG report from a busy weekend that included a slew of studio visits, and Bushwick’s Beat Nite. I also got a chance to see the new film about Camille Claudel at the Film Forum. After Claudel was committed to an asylum by her jealous, deluded brother in 1913, the brilliant artist’s life became … read more… “The Weekend Report, Part 1: Beat Nite 9 in Bushwick, and the EFA Open Studios”

No Comments

Last chance: Julian Pretto’s artists, at Minus Space

Back in the 1970s, when impoverished, downtrodden New York City was on the verge of bankruptcy, gallerist Julian Pretto would contact building owners and ask if he could curate exhibitions in their vacant Soho and Tribeca storefronts. Pretto convinced landlords that his exhibitions would bring people to the neighborhoods, raise the profile of their buildings, … read more… “Last chance: Julian Pretto’s artists, at Minus Space”

3 Comments

Search: MFA art programs, inexpensive, top 10 MFA programs, bigstudios, graduate assistantships

Last year ArtInfo ran a post called “The 10 MFA Programs That Give You the Most Bang For Your Buck” and I was surprised that  University of Connecticut (my alma mater) wasn’t at the top of the list. Here’s why it should be. Halfway between New York City and Boston, UConn is located in the … read more… “Search: MFA art programs, inexpensive, top 10 MFA programs, bigstudios, graduate assistantships”

4 Comments

Serious Sol LeWitt

Paula Cooper recently presented a sensational installation of Sol LeWitt’s Wall Drawing #564, which was originally conceived for the 1988 Venice Biennale. I was knocked out by a few of LeWitt’s small geometric studies on paper, hung near the front desk. Sol LeWitt Sol LeWitt Walking into the rear gallery was like entering an old … read more… “Serious Sol LeWitt”

1 Comment

Search of the Day: Ted Cruz + painting

We can all heave a sigh of relief that the insane Ted Cruz strategy precipitating the government shutdown and a near economic collapse is finally over. I had forgotten that back in July Stephen Colbert took a swipe at the hilarious portrait hanging in the delusional senator’s office. Standing on the floor of the Senate, … read more… “Search of the Day: Ted Cruz + painting”

No Comments

From Marfa to Venice with Ellen Altfest

Guest contributor: Jonathan Stevenson / In “Showing A Little Leg” in the November issue of Harper’s, novelist Dan Keane offers a clever, peripatetic piece that delves into the history of particular paintings by New York-based Ellen Altfest, which appeared with other of her paintings at the 2013 Venice Biennale, and prompts readers to think about … read more… “From Marfa to Venice with Ellen Altfest”

No Comments

Waltemath’s powerful Dinwoody drawings

At Schema Projects, the unusual name for Joan Waltemath’s 2005-08 series of graphite-on-Mylar drawings, “The Dinwoodies,” comes from Dinwoody petroglyphs (rock carvings) associated with Mountain Shoshone and the Plains Shoshone Indians. [Image at top: Joan Waltemath, Dinwoody I, 2005, graphite, colored pencil on mylar plot, 80 x 20 1/2 inches. Courtesy of the artist’s website.] … read more… “Waltemath’s powerful Dinwoody drawings”

No Comments

Dan Walsh: “I have a major commitment to my brushes”

As Jerry Saltz blogged last week, silkscreening, stenciling, assemblage, collage, spray painting and scraping all play a major role in contemporary painting. To his list, I’d add masking and pouring. These are all techniques that privilege the accidental and intuitive over the intentional brushstroke. At Paula Cooper, Dan Walsh’s new geometric paintings embrace traditional brushwork, … read more… “Dan Walsh: “I have a major commitment to my brushes””

1 Comment

Scolding artists, Saltz declares painting nearly dead

Scolding artists on Vulture today, Jerry Saltz reports that he is almost ready to declare painting dead. His rant reminds me of an old art professor who would read the whole class the riot act for not working hard enough, and then double back to assure his favorite students that he didn’t mean them. Here’s … read more… “Scolding artists, Saltz declares painting nearly dead”

22 Comments