On the waterfront: Diana Horowitz at Hirschl & Adler

Diana Horowitz’s second solo exhibition at Hirschl & Adler features close to twenty new paintings, ranging in size from 8 x 10 inches to 22 x 34 inches. Horowitz is known for her open-air urban panoramas of Brooklyn and Manhattan, but she’s also presenting some purely abstract paintings. In the NY Sun, Maureen Mullarkey reports … read more… “On the waterfront: Diana Horowitz at Hirschl & Adler”

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Smokestack symbolism in Demuth’s paintings at the Whitney

In the NYTimes, Ken Johnson writes that gay precisionist Charles Demuth might have felt marginalized by the mainly heterosexual art world. “If true, that interpretation casts the Lancaster paintings in another intriguing light. You could read the series as Demuth’s attempt to shuck off any stigma of effeminacy that might have accompanied his career as … read more… “Smokestack symbolism in Demuth’s paintings at the Whitney”

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Proto-Bohemian Gustave Courbet arrives at the Metropolitan

Courbet would be glad to know that everyone’s still talking about him. In the NYTimes, Roberta Smith writes that Courbet only grudgingly accepted the title of Realist. “Even in front of his most realistic work, you often find yourself wrestling not so much with lived reality, as with the sheer — very real — uncanniness … read more… “Proto-Bohemian Gustave Courbet arrives at the Metropolitan”

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The backstory: Poons and Taylor

In the NYSun, Stephen Maine writes that the absence of an artistic vanguard makes everything old new again. “Among the wildly disparate features of today’s art-world landscape, two modes of pictorial thought with venerable lineages have recently re-emerged: materials-oriented abstract painting, and a linear approach to the investigation of the third dimension that may conveniently … read more… “The backstory: Poons and Taylor”

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Anyone can have a dog

In the Palm Beach Daily News, Robert Janjigian chats with author William Secord. “‘The world of dogs is a very small one,’ said author William Secord at the outset of his discussion with moderator Parker Ladd at Friday’s Brazilian Court author breakfast. As the head of the American Kennel Club’s Dog Museum of America in … read more… “Anyone can have a dog”

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The Berkenblit girl

At artnet, Adrian Dannatt reports on Ellen Berkenblit’s recently closed show at Anton Kern. “Her recent exhibition at Anton Kern Gallery consisted of 11 large canvases depicting in consistent black-and-white the profile of a woman who is clearly not a physical ideal, most obviously due to a snub nose so protrusive and dominant it shocks. … read more… “The Berkenblit girl”

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Cindy Tower paints in St. Louis’s abandoned factories

Malcolm Gay reports in the Riverfront Times that ex-New York sculptor/installation artist Cindy Tower is painting in St. Louis. “For the past two and a half years, Tower, a petite woman with shoulder-length auburn hair, a surfeit of fierce opinions and a mannequin fashioned from old sofa cushions to look like a bodyguard, has ventured … read more… “Cindy Tower paints in St. Louis’s abandoned factories”

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Tower news

A new observation tower is in the works. Five designs (after clicking, scroll down for images)by British architecture firms have been shortlisted in the competition to build the Mersey Observatory, an £11m viewing point and gallery space for the beach. The designs – which range from a dramatic, pier-like structure to a tower shaped like … read more… “Tower news”

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DetroitArts sets up shop in Berlin

Former Detroit art blogger Ann Gordon, recently relocated to Berlin, reports that her new blog, BerlinArts, will take a look into the Berlin arts scene. The main focus is on visual/fine arts.’”Berlin is a city of youth and culture where just about everyone you run into is an artist, musican, dancer, designer or writer. It … read more… “DetroitArts sets up shop in Berlin”

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New National Gallery Director Penny nixes blockbuster shows

Nicholas Penny, the new director of London’s National Gallery, said yesterday that the 184-year-old institution had a duty to display art with which the public is unfamiliar rather than yet another parade of a famous artist’s greatest hits. The Times art correspondent Dalya Alberge speaks with Penny about the forthcoming exhibition of the Italian Divisionists. … read more… “New National Gallery Director Penny nixes blockbuster shows”

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