What’s in Warhol’s time capsules

In the Telegraph, Warhol Museum archivist Matt Wrbican reveals that, of the 610 capsules, only 19 have been fully cataloged; 91 have been inventoried; and 40 or so have been peeked into, with notes made of their more interesting contents. All the rest are still unopened, kept in the vast, climate-controlled storage room. Thanks to … read more… “What’s in Warhol’s time capsules”

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Eva Lake’s “Richter Scale” rocks Portland

“Eva Lake: Richter Scale,” Augen Gallery, Portland, OR. Through Dec. 29. Carolyn Zick at Dangerous Chunky raves over Eva Lake‘s new show in Portland. “Eva Lake’s exhibit is called “Richter Scale,” and with good reason. The paintings optically bounce off the wall as you enter the gallery. After having had the pleasure of following her … read more… “Eva Lake’s “Richter Scale” rocks Portland”

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Stegner’s hot cops at Bellwether

“Jansson Stegner,” Bellwether, New York, NY. Through Dec. 22. In ArtCal Zine, Joshua Johnson reports that Stegner has left behind the brushwork and personal touch seen in his previous work in favor of something more aloof. “Stegner’s subjects, police officers, are portrayed in a mannerist style, lounging in ideal naturalistic settings. That mannerism is one … read more… “Stegner’s hot cops at Bellwether”

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Paul McCartney and Mark Wallinger news

According to This is Nottingham, Sir Paul McCartney has become obsessed with Jan Vermeer’s painting “The Guitar Player.” English Heritage, who owns the painting, told Paul that the painting isn’t for sale at any price, but if it were, art expert Bart Cornelis said it could be worth more than £50 millon. Apparently Paul, a … read more… “Paul McCartney and Mark Wallinger news”

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Ellsworth Kelly film arrives in Boston

“Ellsworth Kelly: Fragments,” produced by Edgar B. Howard and Jo Carole Lauder, directed by Edgar B. Howard and Tom Piper. Distributed by Checkerboard Film Foundation. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA. Showing Dec. 13, 16, 19, 22, 29. Since the beginning of his career, Kelly’s emphasis on pure form and color, and his impulse to … read more… “Ellsworth Kelly film arrives in Boston”

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LA painters work like there’s no tomorrow, er, I mean yesterday

In the LA Times, Christopher Knight (the art critic, not the former Brady Buncher) tries to make a case that LA painters have revived the medium that New York killed in the Seventies because they don’t have to contend with the historical baggage. “Unlike New York, Los Angeles never had an established reputation as a … read more… “LA painters work like there’s no tomorrow, er, I mean yesterday”

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In San Francisco: Ouadahi, Bhujbal, Soloman

“Driss Ouadahi: Another Place, Another Me,” Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco, CA. Through Dec. 8. Drawing upon a lifelong interest in architecture, Ouadahi creates a hybrid language of structural design and abstract painting that infuses the rigid form of monotonous buildings with color and light. Broad, multi-colored brushstrokes define volume and depth, but also humanize the … read more… “In San Francisco: Ouadahi, Bhujbal, Soloman”

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Monumental absence at the New Museum

“Unmonumental: The Object in the 21st Century,” curated by Richard Flood, Laura Hoptman, and Massimiliano Gioni. New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York, NY. Through March 23. The only notable thing about painting in the New Museum’s inaugural show is its absence. In the NY Times, Roberta Smith reviews the exhibition, which she sees as … read more… “Monumental absence at the New Museum”

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Pattern and Decoration revisted in Yonkers

“Pattern and Decoration: An Ideal Vision in American Art, 1975-1985,” curated by Anne Swartz. Hudson River Museum, Yonkers, NY. Through Jan. 20. The HRM presents the work of 11 artists prominent within the movement in the 1970s: Cynthia Carlson, Brad Davis, Valerie Jaudon, Jane Kaufman, Joyce Kozloff, Robert Kushner, Kim MacConnel, Tony Robbin, Miriam Schapiro, … read more… “Pattern and Decoration revisted in Yonkers”

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Rave reviews for Schnabel’s new film in which a paralysed man dictates a memoir with his eyeball

“The Diving Bell and the Butterfly,” directed by painter-filmmaker Julian Schnabel. I’m a big fan of Julian Schnabel’s films, especially Basquiat–what painter doesn’t appreciate the scene in the art gallery with Willem Dafoe as the older, undiscovered painter who works as an art installer?–so I’m pleased to read that the new one is equally good. … read more… “Rave reviews for Schnabel’s new film in which a paralysed man dictates a memoir with his eyeball”

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