“I think once I stopped caring quite so much about where I fitted in, and whether it made any sense to be painting, I started getting more and more absorbed in it.”

Cecily Brown, “Indian Tourist,” 2008, oil on linen, 97 x 89″ Courtesy Gagosian Gallery. In the Guardian, Perri Lewis and  Cecily Brown talk about the painting process. “You’ve got the same old materials – just oils and a canvas – and you’re trying to do something that’s been done for centuries. And yet, within those … read more… ““I think once I stopped caring quite so much about where I fitted in, and whether it made any sense to be painting, I started getting more and more absorbed in it.””

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It’s not all milk and honey

 Klaus Weber’s bee shit paintings in Glasgow. Guardian critic Skye Sherwin wonders what’s the difference between a man and a bee. “Not so much to the 18th-century free market advocate Adam Smith, for whom the industrious beehive was a symbol of human progress. Plenty if you’re the German artist Klaus Weber whose ‘bee waste action … read more… “It’s not all milk and honey”

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Turner Prize shortlist: All trans-media artmakers, no video

The four trans-media artists who have been shortlisted for the Turner Prize 2009 are Enrico David, Roger Hiorns, Lucy Skaer and Richard Wright. “Critics of the Turner prize are used to harrumphing crossly about the absence of painting or drawing from the award’s shortlist, and condemning a perceived preponderance of video or film work. This … read more… “Turner Prize shortlist: All trans-media artmakers, no video”

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Andrew Cranston’s dense claustrophobic rooms

In the Guardian, Jessica Lack continues her series on contemporary artists with Andrew Cranston, whose dense claustrophobic paintings are inspired by rooms in great works of literature. “Like Francis Bacon, Andrew Cranston’s currency is claustrophobia, imprisoning both viewer and subject in a hellish nothing. By using fiction as his source material, he ensures that his … read more… “Andrew Cranston’s dense claustrophobic rooms”

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Some old gold: 2006 interview with Howard Hodgkin

Thanks Jen Mazza for posting this link to novelist Colm Tóibín’s 2006 Guardian interview with Howard Hodgkin. Apparently Hodgkin dislikes talking about his paintings and has never let anyone watch him work, so Tóibín’s interview is fairly rare. “The term colourist, Hodgkin says, has no meaning except in terms of very bad art. The idea … read more… “Some old gold: 2006 interview with Howard Hodgkin”

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Two Coats of Paint endorses Obama for president

Stop reading the blogs and go vote! And take a book, the lines may be long. I’ll be reading Sarah Thornton’s new release, Seven Days in the Art World. According to Publishers Weekly, Thornton offers an elegant, evocative, sardonic view into some of the art world’s most prestigious institutions. “The hot, hip contemporary art world, … read more… “Two Coats of Paint endorses Obama for president”

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“Francis Bacon was one of the greatest painters of the twentieth century…”

Thanks, Art Observed, for putting together this link list of articles about the Francis Bacon show at Tate Britain. Bacon, like Frida Kahlo, is one of those painters with whom every freshman art student falls in love. Later, after spending a few semesters in the studio, they’re inevitably drawn to more challenging work.Major Celebration Heralding … read more… ““Francis Bacon was one of the greatest painters of the twentieth century…””

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Rothko edits Rothko

In The Independent Claire Dwyer Hoggs talks to Chris Rothko, Mark Rothko‘s son and editor of The Artist’s Reality: Philosophies of Art, a new book of his father’s writing. “‘People imagine my father had a glamorous existence, but he lived mainly in slums,’ Christopher says, as he settles into his chair. Mark Rothko’s best-known paintings … read more… “Rothko edits Rothko”

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Peter McDonald wins John Moores Painting Prize

Peter McDonald’s painting depicting an artist slashing a canvas has won this year’s John Moores contemporary painting prize. “Fontana,” by the Tokyo-born McDonald, reimagines the working practice of Italian artist Lucio Fontana, who made a series of works featuring canvases with slashes and holes. The painting, chosen from 40 works shortlisted for the £25,000 prize, … read more… “Peter McDonald wins John Moores Painting Prize”

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Rothko’s Chapel: Everyone’s missing the suicidal artist’s point

In The Guardian Jonathan Jones reports that his visit to the Rothko Chapel in Houston left him impressed, but troubled that Rothko‘s project is so clearly misunderstood by all the religious groups who meet there. “Locals use this place. In fact, they love it. They come not just as tourists but to meditate, pray, and … read more… “Rothko’s Chapel: Everyone’s missing the suicidal artist’s point”

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