Medrie MacPhee: Flat-out at Tibor de Nagy

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Medrie MacPhee’s new paintings, on view at Tibor de Nagy (recently relocated to shared space with Betty Cuningham on the Lower East Side) feature sewing notions and fabric pieces—zippers, pockets, buttons, facings, sleeves, and so forth—all harvested from cheap, disassembled clothing. The elements and shapes are flattened out, pasted onto … read more… “Medrie MacPhee: Flat-out at Tibor de Nagy”

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When do artists leave the country?

Contributed by Sharon Butler / On Wednesday, MarketWatch, a financial blog published by the Dow Jones company, ran a provocative piece suggesting that the time might be approaching for Americans to begin planning an exit strategy from Trumplandia. “To cut to the chase,” Brett Arends, one of their financial columnists wrote, “it is becoming increasingly clear … read more… “When do artists leave the country?”

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Update: Ryan McLaughlin

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Last time I saw a solo of Ryan McLaughlin’s endearing, small-scale paintings was in 2013 at Laurel Gitlen, a painting-friendly LES gallery that closed a little over a year ago. His enigmatic work, conjuring the dry, flat surfaces of 1940s easel-size abstraction, incorporates fragmented pieces of text, code, and other symbols. According to a recent email, Gitlen has … read more… “Update: Ryan McLaughlin”

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Marsden Hartley’s influences and ambition

Contributed by Sharon Butler / In the New York art community of the early 1900s, Marsden Hartley (born Lewiston, Maine 1877; died 1943 Ellsworth, Maine) found success elusive, and discovered, as almost all artists do, that developing a unique voice was a challenging proposition. He worked in New York, spent several years traveling to Europe, New … read more… “Marsden Hartley’s influences and ambition”

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Rounding the corner: Joan Waltemath at Anita Rogers

Contributed by Sharon Butler / In “Fecund Algorithms,” a solo exhibition of new paintings and diminutive sewn-canvas works, Joan Waltemath diverts gently from the quiet perfection of her previous work to embrace small accidents and contingencies. On view at Anita Rogers’s new light-filled second-floor gallery in Soho, Waltemath’s work looks exquisite in the elegantly appointed room, which boasts Greek columns and a long wall of oversized … read more… “Rounding the corner: Joan Waltemath at Anita Rogers”

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Invitation: “Sharon Butler: Good Morning” at SEASON in Seattle

UPDATE (May 26): Thanks Erin Langner for including the exhibition in art ltd Magazine‘s “Critic’s Picks” section. The show is on view through June 3o: New York artist Sharon Butler’s “Good Morning Drawings” play with expectations of painting’s role to the digital world. Pushing past the oft-revisited inquiry into the medium’s pending death, the ten works on view … read more… “Invitation: “Sharon Butler: Good Morning” at SEASON in Seattle”

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CounterPointe: From white cube to black box

Contributed by Sharon Butler / CounterPointe, an inspired dance project organized by Jason Andrew and Julia Gleich of Norte Maar, unfurled last weekend at the Actors Fund Arts Center in downtown Brooklyn. In its fifth year, the project comprised a series of dances created collaboratively by female visual artists and choreographers. The artists and audience had … read more… “CounterPointe: From white cube to black box”

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Lunchtime dystopia: CON-Figuration at Postmasters

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Not far from the courthouse, wandering jurors like myself might happen upon Postmasters Gallery on Franklin Street during the mandated 1-2 pm lunchbreak. Currently on view is a densely hung exhibition of figurative work called “CON-Figuration,” a big, bawdy show of digital collage, painting, woven tapestries of porn web pages, and … read more… “Lunchtime dystopia: CON-Figuration at Postmasters”

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Rainy day in New York

When I got to the studio this dreary grey morning, my coat and tote bags were sopping wet. Looking up from the building’s entrance on Washington Street, I saw that the Manhattan Bridge was barely visible in the rain, and the street was, for once, absent of wedding photographers, brides, grooms, and selfie-stick wielding tourists. … read more… “Rainy day in New York”

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Free speech: White artist paints Emmett Till, black artists protest

Contributed by Sharon Butler / In 1955, two white men brutally lynched  Emmet Till, a black 14-year-old boy from Chicago who was visiting relatives in their Mississippi town. The men were arrested, tried, and unjustly, outrageously, acquitted of all charges. At the time, horrifying photographs of Till’s mutilated face, taken as he lay in an open casket with … read more… “Free speech: White artist paints Emmett Till, black artists protest”

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