Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: February 2019

February is a short month, which makes visiting all the shows that much harder, but before the onslaught of NYC art fairs  in March (the 6th through 10th), try to visit some galleries, either IRL or online. After all, we can’t spend every minute obsessing over Adam Schiff’s investigations, the House Committee  hearings, SC Mueller and the Russia probe, team Trump indictments, impeachment progress, … read more… “Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: February 2019”

1 Comment

Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: January 2019

Contributed by Sharon Butler / The new year brings good news for Bushwick gallery goers: The L Train, which was scheduled for a 15-month shutdown to undergo repairs  beginning this year, is NOT shutting down. This is a welcome decision for the artists and galleries that live and work along the path of the L–Williamsburg, Bushwick, and Ridgewood … read more… “Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: January 2019”

No Comments

Vija Celmins: To fix the image in memory

Contributed by Laurie Fendrich / Anyone walking out of the Vija Celmins retrospective that opened last week at SFMoMA thinking how good she is at copying things might just as well have stayed at Starbucks and googled her name on Wikipedia, where this dumber-than-dumb entry awaits: Vija Celmins is an acclaimed Latvian-American visual artist best … read more… “Vija Celmins: To fix the image in memory”

10 Comments

Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: December 2018

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Well, hello there December. I just completed a hectic (but energizing) semester teaching three courses–New York Academy of Art, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and Parsons at the New School–and I’m eager to head out and see some exhibitions before the holidays.  Tra la la. Don’t forget to give the gift of … read more… “Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: December 2018”

No Comments

Abraham Orden’s guide to current NYC shows

“Painters still look, as Monet looked, but there aren’t many around who look and nothing but. Painting is no longer just painting; now it is always ‘painting after’ something, as in ‘painting after photography…’”Read more at artnet.com.

No Comments

The “touchingly strange” paintings of Georges Rouault

Michael Kimmelman reviews the Rouault exhibition in today’s NYTimes. “At one time Rouault’s reputation rivaled Matisse’s, and his clowns and prostitutes were as ubiquitously reproduced as Ben Shahn posters. He had retrospectives at the Museum of Modern Art in 1945 and 1953; when he died in 1958, at 87, the French government organized a state … read more… “The “touchingly strange” paintings of Georges Rouault”

No Comments

The superslick, super-flat, superexpensive paintings of Takashi Murakami

Jerry Saltz reviews the show in New York Magazine. “The main attractions of this exhibition are 50 little happy-faced flower paintings and six large portraits of a haggard-looking Zen patriarch. The flowers are insipid. So are the portraits, although at least with them Murakami is up to his old extreme stylization. But the real content … read more… “The superslick, super-flat, superexpensive paintings of Takashi Murakami”

No Comments