Art and Film: Aronofsky’s Bosch-esque mother!

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / Albert Oehlen is perhaps foremost among visual artists seeking to capture the jangled frenzy of the Internet Age, having done so in virtuosic paintings that conveyed its sometimes frightening but often funny digital visitations into daily life and the everyday psyche. When his remarkable exhibition “Home and Garden” appeared at … read more… “Art and Film: Aronofsky’s Bosch-esque mother!”

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Art and film: Kogonada and Modernism in “Columbus”

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / Columbus is a serenely penetrating postmodern film, acted with realistic understatement and set in the eponymous city in Indiana – coincidentally if perhaps ironically, Mike Pence’s home town. Directed by the young South Korean filmmaker Kogonada (remarkably, it’s his first feature), the movie involves the convergence of two people from … read more… “Art and film: Kogonada and Modernism in “Columbus””

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Art and film: “Detroit” and Faulkner’s truth

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / William Faulkner famously said, “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” That is a key truth about one of his central concerns – race in America. Kathryn Bigelow, in her harrowingly compelling film Detroit, uses that truth as a kind of nightstick with which to beat the audience … read more… “Art and film: “Detroit” and Faulkner’s truth”

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Film: A strategic retreat’s smirk of defiance in DUNKIRK

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson /In his paradoxically granular war epic Dunkirk, Christopher Nolan assumes viewers know that the British Army’s 1940 strategic retreat from the eponymous French coastal town was crucial to Allied victory in World War II, minimizing narrative exposition and personal back-story and thrusting the audience straight into onslaught, survival, and endeavor. Nolan employs three … read more… “Film: A strategic retreat’s smirk of defiance in DUNKIRK”

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Art and Film: Ghost as witness

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / George Eliot said, wisely, that “our dead are never dead to us, until we have forgotten them.” For the great and infamous, it’s a prescription for immortality. As to more ordinary people, the sentiment can be cloyingly anodyne around the moment of a loved one’s death – it was viciously … read more… “Art and Film: Ghost as witness”

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Art and Film: Not so simple folk (art)

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / According to Aisling Walsh’s irrepressibly winning Maudie (2016), Maud Dowley, plagued by juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, was through no fault of her own a high-maintenance sibling whom an impatient older brother deposited with a mean aunt. Maud found existential solutions in an untutored talent for painting outdoor scenes and an essentially … read more… “Art and Film: Not so simple folk (art)”

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Art and Film: The life and death of a cinephilic boomtown

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / A somewhat film-nerdy set of historical facts gave rise to found-footage maven Bill Morrison’s extraordinarily artful and expansive documentary Dawson City: Frozen Time. Dawson City, Yukon Territory, was the Klondike Gold Rush’s quintessential boomtown, over the course of two years swelling in population from 500 to 40,000 in 1898. Within … read more… “Art and Film: The life and death of a cinephilic boomtown”

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Art and Film: Wajda’s final word on art and politics

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / Wladyslaw Strzeminski, the reluctant hero of Afterimage, the great Polish director Andrzej Wajda’s last film before his death at age 90 last year, was a legendary avant-garde artist in Poland before World War II. He believed the painter’s job was to transform everyday experience into a singular aesthetic expression, an endeavor that was completely … read more… “Art and Film: Wajda’s final word on art and politics”

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Art and Film: Stefan Zweig and the artist’s abdication

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / If poet Pablo Neruda weaponized his talent and his plight to stand against authoritarian forces in his native Chile and elsewhere during his peripatetic exile, the prolific writer Stefan Zweig, a Jew who left Austria in 1934 as Hitler rose to power, was his timorous opposite. Yet there is a … read more… “Art and Film: Stefan Zweig and the artist’s abdication”

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Art and Film: Elizabeth Murray and the splendor of the ordinary

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / Elizabeth Murray, who died too young at 66 in 2007, stretched and contorted household scenes and objects into kinetic abstract festivals on baroquely shaped canvases that defied and escaped the presumed domestic tyranny of wifely and motherly duty. That may be what a Guerrilla Girl – fittingly interviewed in her … read more… “Art and Film: Elizabeth Murray and the splendor of the ordinary”

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