Farley Aguilar’s screamingly urgent figurative paintings

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Farley Aguilar’s paintings, on view at Lyles & King, are based on vintage photographs of 1920s and ‘30s seaside beauty pageants and images of female Nazi collaborators having their heads shaved after World War II. The contrast is jarring at first but fits into an insightfully integrated sense of powerlessness … read more… “Farley Aguilar’s screamingly urgent figurative paintings”

No Comments

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye: Call it soulfulness

Contributed by Matt Mitchell / Reviewers have compulsively apprehended Lynette Yiadom-Boakye’s loving images of dark-skinned people as manifestations of black identity politics, despite the artist’s insistence that those issues are not central to her work. And, in fact, her paintings can yield some penetrating insights about the new figuration when the viewer looks beyond race. On view … read more… “Lynette Yiadom-Boakye: Call it soulfulness”

1 Comment

Elena Sisto: A new kind of freedom

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Elena Sisto’s new paintings, on view at Bookstein Projects through October 27, focus smartly on hair. Lively thick brushstrokes snake around diminutive, brightly colored faces, conjuring the stylized coifs of Gustav Klimt and the Vienna Secession. For Klimt, who was working in Vienna when Freud began hypothesizing about the power of … read more… “Elena Sisto: A new kind of freedom”

No Comments

Soberly upbeat: Summer shows at DC Moore

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / Summer is irrevocably a time for diversion and good cheer, but how much escapism can be indulged in good conscience is relative to the times, and these are deeply troubled ones. DC Moore’s zingy group exhibition “ZIG ZAG ZIG,” on view through August 10, strikes a fine balance between the sunny seasonal … read more… “Soberly upbeat: Summer shows at DC Moore”

No Comments

Karin Campbell’s grins and grimaces

Karin Campbell’s glistening paintings of disjointed mouths, eyes, and teeth hide in plain site. Both densely layered and sparse, her recent abstract canvases are cartoonish takes on the line between exposition and concealment. On the occasion of her first solo exhibition, at 106 Green in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, artist Nick Irzyk talked to Campbell about desperate humor, her early performance pieces, … read more… “Karin Campbell’s grins and grimaces”

No Comments

Haley Josephs talks to Austin Lee about her new paintings

Brooklyn-based painter Haley Josephs makes enigmatic paintings of powerful, archetypal women, often engaged in private activities or rituals that can be both disturbing and absurd. Painted on black canvases, her new images feature rich, saturated color, as if the landscapes are on fire, or infused with the dramatic light of toxic sunsets. On the occasion of her second solo show at Deli Gallery in LIC, “When … read more… “Haley Josephs talks to Austin Lee about her new paintings”

No Comments

Robin Lowe’s exquisitely eerie paintings

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / It goes almost without saying that paintings of people need to bring more to the table than faithful visual representations of what the people look like. But what, exactly? There is of course a range of options as to the kinds of enhancements a painter can incorporate. Natural environment, social milieu, and personal activity are some … read more… “Robin Lowe’s exquisitely eerie paintings”

1 Comment

Anything but random: Jamian Juliano-Villani

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Last week the Visiting Artist Lecture Series kicked off at Parsons’ Kellen Auditorium with a lecture by Jamian Juliano-Villani, a cheeky, unfiltered speaker who has a painting show on view at JTT through February 24. Highly entertaining, her presentation played as both an edgy artist’s talk and a hilarious stand-up … read more… “Anything but random: Jamian Juliano-Villani”

1 Comment

Studio Visit: James Rauchman

Contributed by Sharon Butler / We were born several years apart, but James Rauchman and I have the same severe late-February birthday. Babies born in the northeast during the dark, cold winter months are a hearty breed, and when I stopped by his Morningside studio in December, he and his partner had just bought a house in Vermont, where the … read more… “Studio Visit: James Rauchman”

12 Comments

Jay Senetchko: A tale of two empires

Contributed by Dion Kliner / Looking from painting to painting at “The Course of a Distant Empire,” Jay Senetchko’s fine solo exhibition at Windsor Gallery in Vancouver, you might begin to recall the distinctly dissonant percussion in Tom Waits’s cheerfully ominous song as he plaintively asks, “What’s he building in there?” And then, “Where in its course does this … read more… “Jay Senetchko: A tale of two empires”

No Comments