Fiction: The Western Tailor [Shubha Sunder]

Contributed by Shubha Sunder / At seven o’clock Ramesh turns off the sewing machine, slings his leather bag over his shoulder, and says his customary good-bye to his boss, Parul. Usually he walks straight home after work, but tonight he crosses the street and hides behind an old tamarind tree. From here he has a clear … read more… “Fiction: The Western Tailor [Shubha Sunder]”

2 Comments

Fiction: Brooklyn Bento Box [Ara Tucker]

This week Ara Tucker, a graduate of Princeton University’s Art History and Visual Arts program and an alumna of the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference contributes “Brooklyn Bento Box,” a story about an artist preparing for an upcoming collaborative exhibition with her precocious adopted daughter Vabeh, a “a plucky bi-racial orphan” whose work is already being collected by the parents of her private school pals. As … read more… “Fiction: Brooklyn Bento Box [Ara Tucker]”

No Comments

Fiction: The Square Drawing [Laurie Fendrich]

Today marks the beginning of the Two Coats of Paint fiction column, a special summer section featuring short stories about artists, collectors, galleries, and other matters centered in the art world. Laurie Fendrich has contributed the first story, which is about a drawing that goes missing. NOTE: If you would like to  submit a short story, please send it to … read more… “Fiction: The Square Drawing [Laurie Fendrich]”

5 Comments

Fiction: Light [Rand Richards Cooper]

FOR THIS EDITION of the summer fiction column, my old friend Rand Richards Cooper has contributed “Light,” a poignant story  published in Big as Life, his 1996 collection of short fiction. In “Light” Cooper imagines reconnecting with our old high school art teacher. –SB

2 Comments

Fiction: Consummate Saturday [Paul D’Agostino]

“Consummate Saturday” A short story by Paul Da’Agostino Mina’s fourth and final bout of existence-racking pre-febrile dry heaves terminated at 4:37 on Saturday morning amid the mildew stains, strewn magazines and pubic squalor that adorned Davis’s loathsomely uncivil shared bathroom in a three-bedroom flat. Her supposedly latent and as-yet-undefined illness blossomed into dreadful self-realization no … read more… “Fiction: Consummate Saturday [Paul D’Agostino]”

No Comments

Fiction: The Teddy Bears [Laurie Fendrich]

Our second installment of summer fiction is “The Teddy Bears,” an amusing short story written by artist and arts writer Laurie Fendrich  about a mid-career artist whose gallery closes unexpectedly. The story is loosely inspired by the one we posted last week, “The Unknown Masterpiece” by Honoré de Balzac. Fendrich thinks of “The Teddy Bears”  as a “fable of postmodern art” in … read more… “Fiction: The Teddy Bears [Laurie Fendrich]”

4 Comments

Fiction: The Unknown Masterpiece [Honore De Balzac]

Today marks the beginning of the Two Coats of Paint fiction column, a special summer section featuring short stories about artists, collectors, galleries, and other matters centered in the art world. To kick the series off, we present Balzac’s classic, “The Unknown Masterpiece.” Originally published in 1837 and set in the 1600s, the story is about an old painter named Frenhofer who … read more… “Fiction: The Unknown Masterpiece [Honore De Balzac]”

1 Comment

Art and Fiction: Petrushevskaya and the painter’s whirl

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / If they are successful, artists transport those who view their work to a different visual and psychic environment that nonetheless bears some crucial familiarity to the objective one that most people consciously share. The overlapping frames of reference enable critics, artists, and others to talk about art coherently. That much … read more… “Art and Fiction: Petrushevskaya and the painter’s whirl”

1 Comment

Art and Fiction: Rachel Kushner’s molten optimism

Guest contributor Jonathan Stevenson / The view that the 1970s were culturally under-appreciated is now so firmly entrenched that they no longer are. With respect to the New York art world, Rachel Kushner’s audacious novel The Flamethrowers, set in 1975, amplifies the point by linking that percolating milieu with the full-boil political scene in Europe, … read more… “Art and Fiction: Rachel Kushner’s molten optimism”

No Comments