“The possibility of radical transformation in the guise of carefree recreation”

In Cabinet, Jordan Bear and Albert Narath earnestly try to wring some meaning from photo caricature cut-outs. “For more than a century, any promenade down a seaside boardwalk has required a stop at an apparently nameless apparatus: a painted wooden façade featuring a colorful character in an outlandish situation with a hole where its head … read more… ““The possibility of radical transformation in the guise of carefree recreation””

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Residency at Pocket Utopia this week, Habitat for Artists goes indoors

I’ll be setting up shop at Pocket Utopia in Bushwick this week if anyone wants to stop by. Here are the topics I’d like to discuss: politics in art (health care? environment? race? Did you read The Atlantic this month?), building communities with Wikipedia (warning: this is my new obsession. Read the article on Wiki-government … read more… “Residency at Pocket Utopia this week, Habitat for Artists goes indoors”

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Turning death into another disposable consumer object

In Cabinet Magazine Michael Sappol, curator-historian at the National Library of Medicine (National Institutes of Health) and author of A Traffic of Dead Bodies: Anatomy and Embodied Social Identity in Nineteenth-Century America and Swedish historian Eva Åhren have written about anatomy studies and the current preoccupation with death symbolism. “Anatomy was a death cult. It … read more… “Turning death into another disposable consumer object”

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Mauve-elous

In Cabinet Magazine this month, Shelly Jackson sorts out the color mauve. ” What is mauve? That pale violet that makes certain flowers seem to fluoresce at dusk, or the sullen, sullied rose of Victorian lampshades and mourning dresses? A cooler magenta, a gooier violet? Mauve, the color of ish, is defined most clearly by … read more… “Mauve-elous”

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