Alice Neel at the Zwirners

David Zwirner has two concurrent exhibitions of Alice Neel’s work, “Alice Neel: Selected Works” at the Chelsea branch, and “Alice Neel: Nudes of the 1930s” uptown at Zwirner & Wirth. According to Zwirner, who now represents her estate with a couple other galleries, Neel (1900-1984) is one of the most important American painters of the … read more… “Alice Neel at the Zwirners”

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Ian Whitmore and Graham Caldwell: DC artists move to NYC

Ian Whitmore, who, according to Washington Post’s Blake Gopnik, is one of DC’s most promising young painters, has recently moved to Brooklyn. “In NYC, he gets ‘a big inspiration from something’ at least once a week, from the music scene to the latest art in Chelsea to the Old Masters at the great museums (Whitmore’s … read more… “Ian Whitmore and Graham Caldwell: DC artists move to NYC”

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Nick Miller’s alternative studio

I’m always interested in artists like Nick Miller who have developed unusual studio solutions. Miller’s current show at the New York Studio School features paintings he made in the back of a 8′ x 13′ truck that he converted into mobile studio. The larger paintings, built up with small clotty agitated brushstrokes, don’t translate well … read more… “Nick Miller’s alternative studio”

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Rodney Graham examines modernist myths and moments in Morris Louis tableau

Rodney Graham’ show at 303 Gallery (loathed by bloggers for their “no photography allowed” policy) consists of drip paintings styled in the manner of Morris Louis, and a huge studio photograph in which Graham recreates the fictional livingroom where the paintings were created. In The Washington Post, Blake Gopnik describes the image. “The photo shows … read more… “Rodney Graham examines modernist myths and moments in Morris Louis tableau”

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Charles Cohan’s terminal hieroglyphs

“In what may be the smallest art gallery in the United States, you can discover the whole world.” Blake Gopnik reports in The Washington Post. “Or at least its airport terminals. Atlanta, Berlin, Vilnius, Bangkok, Calgary — all up there on the walls of Curator’s Office in Washington. Charles Cohan, a 47-year-old printmaker and art … read more… “Charles Cohan’s terminal hieroglyphs”

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Brouhaha in Baltimore when local conceptual artist swipes painter’s visual tropes

“Christine Bailey: New Work,” curated by Jordan Faye Block. Corporate lobby at 100 East Pratt Street, Baltimore, MD. Christine Bailey’s new work is painted in the style of one of Baltimore’s well-known painters, Cara Ober, who often blogs about the city’s scene. Bailey claims it’s a conceptual project about branding and originality, while angry Ober … read more… “Brouhaha in Baltimore when local conceptual artist swipes painter’s visual tropes”

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Gopnik asks why: John Alexander retrospective at Smithsonian American Art Museum

“John Alexander: A Retrospective,” curated by Jane Livingston for the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC. Through March 16. In the Washington Post, Blake Gopnik takes aim. “We’ve all come across actors too fond of their thespian skills. They rage when their characters are mad, wail when they’re supposed … read more… “Gopnik asks why: John Alexander retrospective at Smithsonian American Art Museum”

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Before cut-and-paste, copies were made (gasp) by hand

“Déjà Vu? Revealing Repetition in French Masterpieces,” organized by Eik Kahng. Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, MD. Through Jan. 1. Phoenix Art Museum, January 20 through May 4, 2008. In the Baltimore Sun, Glenn McNatt says that by seeing the paintings side-by-side, the painting process is revealed. “How did Monet manage to show that it’s morning … read more… “Before cut-and-paste, copies were made (gasp) by hand”

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Morris Louis unveiled

“Morris Louis Now: An American Master Revisited,” Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC. Through Jan. 6. Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, Feb. 17–May 6, 2007. Back in the sixties, Morris Louis developed an innovative method of painting by “staining” his unprimed canvases with thinned washes of acrylic pigments, and was one of the … read more… “Morris Louis unveiled”

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Earl Cunningham’s imaginary landscapes

“Earl Cunningham’s America,” curated by Virginia Mecklenburg. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC. Through Nov. 4. In the Washington Post, Blake Gopnik reports: “Outsider art is truly peculiar stuff. In some ways, it breaks the rules: It looks coarse and eccentric and up to its own thing. On the other hand, it often knows that’s … read more… “Earl Cunningham’s imaginary landscapes”

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