Assistants: Connected through circumstance

Contributed by Adam Simon / Lineage is not a concept with a lot of currency these days; too close, perhaps, to its more déclassé kissing cousin, tradition. We look to academia and art history to find precursors for artistic innovators. Typically, the presentation and criticism of art tend to focus on the artist as a … read more… “Assistants: Connected through circumstance”

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Thomas Berding: Something wild

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / Thomas Berding’s insouciant show “Field Test,” at The Painting Center in Chelsea, is a smart, spirited consideration of the tension between the whirl and the pastoral. The seven paintings – and their witty titles – are straightforward enough to impart primary messages clearly, but that leaves more time to decrypt the … read more… “Thomas Berding: Something wild”

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Catalogue essay: Jennifer Riley’s Machine Series Paintings

Contributed by Sharon Butler / When Brooklyn artist Jennifer Riley began making large-scale abstract paintings using discarded laser-cut pieces of steel, she connected with a century of artists preoccupied with the deconstructed machine. They ranged from post-World War I Dadaists like Raoul Hausmann and Francis Picabia whose images of humans were crafted from machine parts, … read more… “Catalogue essay: Jennifer Riley’s Machine Series Paintings”

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The meditative process of making: Abstraction in Connecticut

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Co-curators Daphne Anderson Deeds and Jacquelyn Gleisner have organized “State of Abstraction,” a sophisticated  group exhibition comprising elegant work by more than twenty Connecticut artists who explore a wide range of abstract strategies. Thoughtfully installed at the Washington Art Association, the work speaks of emotion, material experimentation, history, and the meditative process of making.

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Last chance: Geometrics II

From Joanne Mattera Art Blog:“For “Geometrics II,” curator Gloria Klein selected 12 artists from the Geoform website. Geoform is a fabulous online resource dedicated to abstract geometric art maintained by Julie Karabenick. Gloria and Julie are two of the 12 artists in the show. The others are Steven Alexander, Laura Battle, Mark Dagley, Julie Gross, … read more… “Last chance: Geometrics II”

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I like line, too

McKenzie Fine Art presents “Linear Abstraction,” which examines of a few of the ways in which artists are using line in abstract imagery these days. Here’s an overview: Mark Dagley paints spherical webs of interlaced lines that reference information technologies and social networking sites. Gilbert Hsiao uses optically-charged, shaped canvases, vibrant color and repeating op-art … read more… “I like line, too”

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Mattera looks at shaped canvas: Pousette-Dart and Gorchov

Joanna Pousette-Dart’s show at Moti Hasson is down, but Joanne Mattera Art Blog has recently uploaded some pretty good images. “Pousette-Dart makes paintings that are chromatically gorgeous. The shapes are quirky, almost cartoony—like a Jetson’s version of ‘modern art’—but they’re elegant, with an almost italic flow. Correspondingly, a calligraphic gesture threads its way over the … read more… “Mattera looks at shaped canvas: Pousette-Dart and Gorchov”

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Totally angular

In the Chicago Tribune Alan G. Artner reports that the artists in “Angles in America” at Rhona Hoffman have “found or constructed geometry within the American everyday, and the resulting works prove that geometry can be quirky, personal, unexpected and far from universal.” Thanks, perhaps, to the recent Tomma Abts fanfare, angles are in the … read more… “Totally angular”

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Studio Update: So long, little shack

When I recently vacated my summer studio shack at Habitat For Artists, Simon Draper, creator/curator of the unusual HFA residency project in Beacon, NY, asked me to write a brief essay on my experience. It’s longer than my usual posts, and some of it may sound familiar from earlier Studio Updates, but I thought readers … read more… “Studio Update: So long, little shack”

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Sarah Walker: Layer upon layer upon layer

In the press release, Sarah Walker claims to use painting “as a tool for perceptual recalibration that enables viewers to detect and intuit disparate spatial systems simultaneously.” Well, OK, I guess so, but no need to be so rhetorically oblique and cerebral. Her mostly small, densely-layered compositions incorporate lattice-like structures, which suggest everything from cellular … read more… “Sarah Walker: Layer upon layer upon layer”

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