Anselm Keifer thinks énorme

Alan Riding looks at the artist chosen for the innaugural solo show at the Grand Palais in Paris. “Since moving to France in 1993, this German-born artist has turned his 50-acre property in Provence into a sprawling installation, with a former silk factory serving as his studio, and warehouses, greenhouses, towers and tunnels displaying his … read more… “Anselm Keifer thinks énorme”

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Frida Kahlo centennial exhibition to premiere at Walker Art Center

Curated by Kahlo biographer and art historian Hayden Herrera and Walker associate curator Elizabeth Carpenter, the presentation will include approximately 50 paintings from the beginning of Kahlo’s career in 1926 to the year of her death in 1954. Following its showing at the Walker, Frida Kahlo will travel to Philadelphia and San Francisco. See images … read more… “Frida Kahlo centennial exhibition to premiere at Walker Art Center”

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The “touchingly strange” paintings of Georges Rouault

Michael Kimmelman reviews the Rouault exhibition in today’s NYTimes. “At one time Rouault’s reputation rivaled Matisse’s, and his clowns and prostitutes were as ubiquitously reproduced as Ben Shahn posters. He had retrospectives at the Museum of Modern Art in 1945 and 1953; when he died in 1958, at 87, the French government organized a state … read more… “The “touchingly strange” paintings of Georges Rouault”

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The superslick, super-flat, superexpensive paintings of Takashi Murakami

Jerry Saltz reviews the show in New York Magazine. “The main attractions of this exhibition are 50 little happy-faced flower paintings and six large portraits of a haggard-looking Zen patriarch. The flowers are insipid. So are the portraits, although at least with them Murakami is up to his old extreme stylization. But the real content … read more… “The superslick, super-flat, superexpensive paintings of Takashi Murakami”

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Jörg Immendorff dies of Lou Gehrig’s disease

According to Spiegel Online International, German painter Jörg Immendorff passed away today from complications related to a neurodegenerative disorder. He was among Germany’s most influential postwar artists. Read more.

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The inscrutable Sigmar Polke

In today’s NYTimes, Carol Vogel visits Polke in his Cologne studio before he ships his paintings to the Venice Biennale. As is always the case with his work, Mr. Polke said, the paintings for the biennale sprang from specific ideas yet evolved in mystical ways as he experimented. “This is the meeting point of ideas … read more… “The inscrutable Sigmar Polke”

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NYT art reviews: Markus Lüpertz & Martin Kippenberger

Roberta Smith looks at German paintings made with a wink and a sneer. “Painting may go in and out of fashion, but its many lifesaving graces always keep it afloat. One is its capacity for what might be called beautiful sarcasm, a sly self-parody while still looking good that is cultivated by many young painters … read more… “NYT art reviews: Markus Lüpertz & Martin Kippenberger”

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David Kapp and Robert Berlind interview Wolf Kahn in The Brooklyn Rail

“D.H. Lawrence said what was good about Moby Dick was that Melville didn’t really know what Moby Dick symbolized. He knew it was a symbol, but he didn’t know what it was a symbol of. In the same way, when you’re thinking about your own motivations and the meanings of your work, the less you … read more… “David Kapp and Robert Berlind interview Wolf Kahn in The Brooklyn Rail”

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