Martin Kippenberger: champion for insincerity

Christian Viveros-Fauné in The Village Voice: “A balky, buffoonish commentary on the social function of art, Kippenberger’s one-take, slapdash paintings mock the market and the approval of juries and art critics alike without ever acknowledging their near-total dependence on the art world’s closed system of meanings for their deepest, even funniest significance.” Read more. Martin … read more… “Martin Kippenberger: champion for insincerity”

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A Brit’s view of street artist Banksy

Guardian art critic Jonathan Jones: “Banksy has achieved something original, something uniquely of our time: found a visual style for self-congratulatory smugness and given a look to well-heeled soi-disant radicalism. So that’s who likes him: self-proclaimed enemies of the state, fermenting in their own self-righteousness.” Read more.

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David Humphrey riffs on linear connections at EFA Gallery

Stephen Maine writes about group show “Horizon” in the NY Sun: “The show is a blast, and a funny send-up of the inevitable catch-all summer group show that commercial galleries struggle to repackage under curatorial cover.” Curator David Humphrey,a painter represented by Sikkema Jenkins & Co. Gallery, suggests that there is a linguistic analogy lurking … read more… “David Humphrey riffs on linear connections at EFA Gallery”

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Wrangling over Rudolf Stingel

Leslie Camhi in the Village Voice: “Zigzagging between figuration and abstraction, his disparate oeuvre is filled with conceptual antics, optical pleasures, and abject traces of his melancholy presence…. At times visually dazzling, his work is also strangely off-putting—flirting on the one hand with decay, and on the other with pure decoration….There’s an emperor’s-new-clothes-ish quality to … read more… “Wrangling over Rudolf Stingel”

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PaintersNYC creates forum for snarky debate

Ana Finel Honigman in the Gaurdian arts blog: “Every month since November 2005, the blog’s two anonymous chairs have posted handsome, medium-sized reproductions of paintings by an artist who can be found in Manhattan. Their selections of images are consistently representative of each artist’s style and the comments they summon up are directed more to … read more… “PaintersNYC creates forum for snarky debate”

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London’s National Army Museum defends painter Gerald Laing’s right to draw his own conclusions

Patrick Sawer in the Evening Standard: “The National Army Museum is at the centre of a political row after it acquired a painting that pins the blame for the 7 July bombings on the Iraq war…. The painting, by leading British pop artist Gerald Laing, will be unveiled before the second anniversary of the suicide … read more… “London’s National Army Museum defends painter Gerald Laing’s right to draw his own conclusions”

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Flemish father of landscape painting resurrected in Madrid

The Museo del Prado in Madrid has organized an exhibition dedicated to Joachim Patinir, a 16th century Flemish artist, contemporary of Bosch, who has gradually slipped into oblivion. He is considered to be the father of landscape painting. The exhibition, titled ” Patinir and the Invention of Landscape”, runs from 3 July – 7 October … read more… “Flemish father of landscape painting resurrected in Madrid”

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Barry Hoggard and James Wagner edit ArtCal, a good site that focuses on underknown galleries and artists in Chelsea, Williamsburg and the NYC area. Images of the exhibitions are posted with all the listings. “All content on this site is at our whim. An absence of a show does not necessarily mean we’re not interested … read more… “”

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17th-century painter’s farmhouse studio faces the wrecking ball

In the Observer, Vanessa Thorpe reports that the farmhouse of Mary Beale, a British pioneer and a leading female painter in England, is threatened by real estate developers. “Beale’s art, enthusiasts argue, is too significant to allow the loss of a centre dedicated to celebrating her life and work. She is seen as a beacon … read more… “17th-century painter’s farmhouse studio faces the wrecking ball”

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