Neil Jenney resurfaces at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum

In the NYTimes, Grace Glueck reports: “Whoa! Could this be the work of Neil Jenney, a star of the 1970s Neo-Expressionist movement, who first intrigued the art world with his so-called “Bad” paintings but has stayed away from the scene for many years?…Apart from their mild, unassertive message, what the paintings convey is that Mr. … read more… “Neil Jenney resurfaces at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum”

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Clive Owen and George Clooney in forgers’ tale

Vanessa Thorpe reports in The Observer: “The extraordinary story of how British forgers John Myatt and John Drewe joined together to con art experts and some of the world’s most prominent private collectors over seven years is to be turned into a Hollywood film, with George Clooney and Clive Owen tipped to play the leading … read more… “Clive Owen and George Clooney in forgers’ tale”

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Jeff Koons on feeling good

In Graeme Green’s sixty second Metro interview with Jeff Koons, Koons declares “I like to make people feel good about themselves and connected with themselves, so that they trust in themselves. It’s not just to make people feel good about themselves, but so that they then have the security to really achieve their potential. If … read more… “Jeff Koons on feeling good”

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Ada and Alex Katz donate paintings from their collection to Colby College Museum of Art

David Cohen reports in The New York Sun: “In 2004, Alex Katz, who turns 80 next week, launched a foundation to collect contemporary art. This is something he and his wife, Ada, had been doing for some years, presenting works, for instance, to the Farnsworth Art Museum in Rockland, Maine, and the Pennsylvania Academy of … read more… “Ada and Alex Katz donate paintings from their collection to Colby College Museum of Art”

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SAM slam

Lee Rosenbaum Lee Rosenbaum reports today in the Wall Street Journal: “Most museums expand to make room for their existing permanent collections. The Seattle Art Museum expanded, to 268,000 from 150,000 square feet, so that it could persuade local donors to augment its permanent collection, in time for its 75th anniversary next year. That campaign, … read more… “SAM slam”

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“Lines, Grids, Stains, Words” at MOMA

Sarah Schmerler in The Village Voice: “This smart little offering of Minimalist drawings is curated by Christian Rattemeyer (late of Artists Space). He’s scarcely been at the museum two months, and already he’s making his mark, mixing and matching periods and makers with impunity and inspiration. Skip the show’s rather dull opening wall text: It … read more… ““Lines, Grids, Stains, Words” at MOMA”

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Critics weigh in on Stella Vine’s show at Modern Art Oxford

In the Telegraph, Richard Dorment reports a change of heart about Stella Vine’s paintings: “Imagine my amazement to discover that there is something to Vine’s work after all. True, in terms of the way she actually applies paint to canvas, she isn’t a beautiful or exciting artist in the way that, say, Elizabeth Peyton or … read more… “Critics weigh in on Stella Vine’s show at Modern Art Oxford”

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At Boston’s Allston Skirt Gallery: a small, dark, and stinky slice of the art-world pie

In The Phoenix Sharon Steel writes about “Pull My Finger,” a new group show at the Allston Skirt Gallery, curated by artist Joe Zane: “Artists? They just live for slinging crap — it’s like some kind of unlimited paint supply that’s handy, cheap, and gets them controversy bonus points. Where would museum-worthy pieces like Andres … read more… “At Boston’s Allston Skirt Gallery: a small, dark, and stinky slice of the art-world pie”

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Paintings in the National Gallery: national heritage, art-historical legacy or status symbols?

Chris Bryant reports in The Times: “The news that seven major artworks on loan to the National Gallery, London, might be sold and may leave the country has a depressing air of inevitability. They are magnificent pieces. Titian’s Portrait of a Young is a serene early portrait, less fleshy than others, sparse in colour yet … read more… “Paintings in the National Gallery: national heritage, art-historical legacy or status symbols?”

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Georges de La Tour’s long forgotten nocturnes exhibited in UK

Laura Cumming in The Guardian: “It scarcely seems possible that there could be any old masters left to rediscover, yet so it is with the French painter Georges de La Tour, a figure almost as shadowy as his near contemporary Vermeer but much longer hidden from the public….In its typically inventive way, Compton Verney is … read more… “Georges de La Tour’s long forgotten nocturnes exhibited in UK”

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