The branding of Mona Lisa: a lesson for young artists

Mary Blume reports in the International Herald Tribune: “If, as André Malraux said, museums do not simply exhibit masterpieces but create them, Sassoon adds that they need to be written about, publicized, to reach iconic status and in mid-19th-century France, more than anywhere else, men and women of letters wrote extensively on the arts. In … read more… “The branding of Mona Lisa: a lesson for young artists”

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Hirst buys Insects

Colin Gleadel reports in the Telegraph’s Market News: “Last week Damien Hirst bought an entire exhibition before it had even opened. Clearly flush from his £130 million sell-out exhibition at White Cube (bar the diamond skull), he spent £500,000 on works by artist/designer Paul Insect, which went on view at the Lazarides Gallery in Soho … read more… “Hirst buys Insects”

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An Iraqi artist’s response to an unfathomable reality

Maymanah Farhat reports on electroniciraq.net: “The fundamental nature and creative force that has propelled the evolution of Iraqi art is what curator Ulrike al-Khamis has described as ‘Its conscious and committed attempt to create a synthesis between historical Iraqi art forms and modernism.’ Concurrently, modern and contemporary Iraqi art has remained impacted by that endured … read more… “An Iraqi artist’s response to an unfathomable reality”

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Hearts, Minds, and Abstract Expressionism

For more on the relationship between government funding and international art collaborations between institutions, check out “Arts and Minds,” an article I wrote for the October issue of The American Prospect. In the article, I examine the new State Department/American Association of Museums program for funding overseas arts projects, through which the U.S. government hopes … read more… “Hearts, Minds, and Abstract Expressionism”

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Personal Jesus: worshiping Warhol and Haring together

Kurt Shaw reports in the Pittsbrugh Tribune-Review: ” There is a kind of poetic logic in the fact that Warhol and Haring created religiously inspired works at the end of their careers. Haring owned one of Warhol’s Last Supper paintings, and Warhol collaborated with Haring on more than one occasion. But the intertwining of the … read more… “Personal Jesus: worshiping Warhol and Haring together”

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Looking at the Serra show from a painter’s perspective

Blogger Joanne Mattera writes: “The mottled and scratched surface texture, always interesting, reveals itself in daylight to be something more like skin: thick here, thin there, pocked, shiny, flaky, smooth. Or skins, plural: human, animal, mammalian, amphibian. Or planetary: a sandy strand, a lunar crust, a Martian landscape. There are red-orange tracks formed by liquid … read more… “Looking at the Serra show from a painter’s perspective”

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Last chance to see “Colorfield Remix” in DC

CBSnews.com reported: “A city-wide celebration called “Colorfield Remix” features some 30 different exhibits honoring the homegrown Washington Color School. The Washington Color School was in it’s heyday in the 1960s and was comprised of a small group of painters who were making big, bright works known as Color Field paintings: Artists like Morris Louis, Kenneth … read more… “Last chance to see “Colorfield Remix” in DC”

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“My Name is Alan and I Paint Pictures” premieres at the NY International Independent Film Festival

“After nearly six years of production, director/producer Johnny Boston has completed his feature length documentary titled, ‘My Name is Alan and I Paint Pictures,’ a film that documents the life of Alan Russell Cowan which is slated for its US Premiere with the NY International Independent Film Festival on July 25. After winning the honor … read more… ““My Name is Alan and I Paint Pictures” premieres at the NY International Independent Film Festival”

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Harwood Museum presents Diebenkorn’s work from grad school

Kyle MacMillan reports in the Denver Post: “With a painting from Richard Diebenkorn’s “Ocean Park” series in almost every major art museum in the country, it would certainly seem he is something of a known commodity by now. And to a large degree, he is. But as an important summer exhibition at the Harwood Museum … read more… “Harwood Museum presents Diebenkorn’s work from grad school”

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Claude Monet’s unknown drawings and sketches at the Clark Art Institute

Ken Johnson in the Boston Globe: “For Monet, the drawing problem was twofold. Practically, his drawing skills were not up to academic standards. And he was temperamentally disinclined to submit to the conservative authority of academic rules and regulations. So even if it is true that Monet continued to draw through his career, what is … read more… “Claude Monet’s unknown drawings and sketches at the Clark Art Institute”

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