Scooter LaForge and the sporadic, subconscious mind

Contributed by Grant Wahlquist / Scooter LaForge is a painter who lives and works in New York City. His current exhibition at Theodore:Art, “Everything is Going to be OK,” features sculptures, works on canvas, and garments incorporating painting. I recently spoke with Scooter regarding the show, his artistic forebears, and his process in the studio. 

No Comments

Rounding the corner: Joan Waltemath at Anita Rogers

Contributed by Sharon Butler / In “Fecund Algorithms,” a solo exhibition of new paintings and diminutive sewn-canvas works, Joan Waltemath diverts gently from the quiet perfection of her previous work to embrace small accidents and contingencies. On view at Anita Rogers’s new light-filled second-floor gallery in Soho, Waltemath’s work looks exquisite in the elegantly appointed room, which boasts Greek columns and a long wall of oversized … read more… “Rounding the corner: Joan Waltemath at Anita Rogers”

2 Comments

On elephant dick: A conversation between Todd Bienvenu and Cynthia Daignault

On the occasion of “Water Sports,” Todd Bienvenu’s solo show on view at yours mine & ours through May 14, friend and fellow painter Cynthia Daignault talked to Bienvenu about learning to paint, art history, and the material reality of painting. “I don’t have to look very hard for ideas,” Bienvenu told Daignault. “My favorite paintings are about really dumb and obvious things. But … read more… “On elephant dick: A conversation between Todd Bienvenu and Cynthia Daignault”

1 Comment

Quicktime: Fast, casual painting in Philadelphia

Contributed by Becky Huff Hunter / In his influential Art in America article “Provisional Painting” (2009), critic Raphael Rubinstein traced a history—from Joan Miró to Mary Heilmann—of “works that look casual, dashed-off, tentative, unfinished or self-cancelling,” that “constantly risk inconsequence or collapse.” In Rubinstein’s analysis, this attitude provides an easier yoke for artists tired of laboring … read more… “Quicktime: Fast, casual painting in Philadelphia”

2 Comments

Al Taylor, structurally unique

Contributed by Katie Fuller / The masterly early paintings of Al Taylor, currently exhibited at David Zwirner, were made from 1971 through 1980, before he began creating his famously sculptural forms. Most of the paintings are rather large and vertical, and adhere to the rule of thirds, though some are split starkly in half by … read more… “Al Taylor, structurally unique”

No Comments

Studio visit: Frédérique Lucien

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Frédérique Lucien and I met during the Bushwick iteration of “Deux Côtés / Two Sides,” a collaborative exhibition organized by Stephanie Theodore and Emilie Ovaere-Corthay, the director of legendary Galerie Jean Fournier. When I was in Paris for the opening, I got a chance to stop by Lucien’s studio in the 11th arrondissement, not far from the Bataclan Theater that was tragically … read more… “Studio visit: Frédérique Lucien”

No Comments

A studio visit with Sascha Braunig

Contributed by Rob Kaiser-Schatzlein / Sascha Braunig, whose solo show “Shivers,” is on view at MoMA PS1 through March 5, recently returned to New York City from Portland, Maine, to participate in the Sharpe Walentas Studio Program. When I stopped by her new space, we discussed her process and the changes that have taken place in her practice over the past five years.

1 Comment

Francesco Clemente: Constantly beginning

In Paris last week I stopped by Galerie Templon near the Centre Pompidou to see Francesco Clemente’s charming new paintings. An Italian artist who travels between New York, Rome, New Mexico and India, Clemente was one of the painters involved in the rebirth of figurative painting and the movement known as Neo-Expressionism during the 1980s.  

1 Comment

Godward and upward at SLAG

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / Ben Godward is at home with bright colors and exotic shapes. The New York sculptor has for some time been producing boldly optic, resolutely asymmetrical pieces that render impressions of roiling urban excess into freewheeling mixed media, abundantly featuring foam, urethane resin, and Day-Glo hues. Much of his work’s appeal … read more… “Godward and upward at SLAG”

1 Comment

Marjorie Welish: Procedural difference, conceptual consequence

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Followers of post-election news coverage, despairing over rampant voter suppression, are bereft over the Electoral College electors’ unwillingness to cast their votes for the sane candidate who overwhelmingly won the popular vote. The vocal majority, fretting about what to expect after the inauguration of an undisciplined kleptocrat as the 45th president of the United States, will recognize their heartache in … read more… “Marjorie Welish: Procedural difference, conceptual consequence”

No Comments