Kristen Mills: Plausible hope

Contributed by Zach Seeger / Kristen Mills’s “Believability” is a richly constructed, well-meaning, humorous-but-not installation of videos, sculpted environments, and cacophonous formal musings on the difficulty of personal and professional perseverance in an uncertain time. Just prior to our current collective crises came a burgeoning Chicago Imagist-inspired painting moment, formal and figurative, that seemed a … read more… “Kristen Mills: Plausible hope”

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Joan Snyder: Painting from the inside out

Contributed by Jason Andrew / In a 1976 Cincinnati Enquirer review of Joan Snyder’s paintings, the reviewer, Owen Findsen, surmised that she had “picked up a little of this, a little of that … and made it all uglier.” While he found her work offensive, even questioning it’s validity, for those like me who have … read more… “Joan Snyder: Painting from the inside out”

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Interview: Brandi Twilley and life in the studio

Contributed by Caroline Wells Chandler/ I met Brandi Twilley back in 2008 when we started graduate school together at Yale. Both Southerners and eager for a change of scenery, we became fast friends. For over a decade we have talked extensively about art and creating a sustainable life around making work in NYC. This interview … read more… “Interview: Brandi Twilley and life in the studio”

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Art and Film: DIY festival for readers who miss NYC

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / Even deprived of movie houses, cinephiles abhor a vacuum. Criterion may be their readiest source for a themed set of noteworthy films or the center-cut of an auteur’s oeuvre. Another option is to pan the metaphorical stream of mostly indifferent content for nuggets of gold. There’s especially fine below-the-radar fare … read more… “Art and Film: DIY festival for readers who miss NYC”

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Radical reorientation: Rural life, politics, and a pandemic in Joshua Tree

Contributed by Mary Addison Hackett / “How’s everyone doing?” is the occasional check-in I see posted among artist friends who haven’t completely jumped the Facebook ship. In a group devoted to issues relevant to online and F2F teaching during the pandemic, the check-ins are more dire. Artists are on edge, frustrated, and in some cases, … read more… “Radical reorientation: Rural life, politics, and a pandemic in Joshua Tree”

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The objectness of Rachael Gorchov

Contributed by Jason Andrew / There is a long history of artists expanding the objectness – that is, the sculptural dimension – of painting. Picasso and Braque introduced this concept in their assemblage works; Vladimir Tatlin broadened it in his “counter-reliefs” alongside Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoventhe, the “Dada Baroness”. For the Dadaists, breaking the picture plane … read more… “The objectness of Rachael Gorchov”

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Summertime blues: Clark, Fagan, Carrigan, Dubicki, Hocker, and Samelson in Torrington

Contributed by Laurie Fendrich / To walk into an open art gallery during this COVID-caused gloaming of the art world is perhaps to catch a glimpse of dawn. That’s what it felt like to me, anyway, when a couple of weeks ago I visited the not-for-profit Five Points Gallery at the Five Points Center for … read more… “Summertime blues: Clark, Fagan, Carrigan, Dubicki, Hocker, and Samelson in Torrington”

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Sobriety, resilience, and hope at Massey Klein Gallery

Contributed by Riad Miah / Emerging from lockdown, Massey Klein Gallery on the Lower East Side has reopened its doors, if only by appointment, with two new exhibitions featuring three artists. Claire Lieberman and Louis Reith’s works are shown together in “Elemental” while Bethany Czarnecki has a separate exhibition of a new series of paintings … read more… “Sobriety, resilience, and hope at Massey Klein Gallery”

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