Yulia Iosilzon: Trapped in paradise

Contributed by Catherine Haggarty / “Yulia Iosilzon: Paradeisos” – the first solo exhibition of the London-based artist, smartly curated by Kate Mothes – is currently on view at Carvalho Park. Continuing to explore and challenge boundaries separating performance, installation, textile, sculpture, design, painting, and drawing, this abundant gallery space nicely showcases Iosilzon’s twelve striking nine-foot-high … read more… “Yulia Iosilzon: Trapped in paradise”

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Studio visit with Jill Levine

Contributed by Susan Wanklyn / For many years Jill Levine has explored the territory between painting and sculpture. Her pieces are constructed with Styrofoam shapes, covered with rigid wrap and modeling pastes, and painted with bright geometric forms and symbols. On the occasion of her solo at High Noon Gallery, we met in her studio … read more… “Studio visit with Jill Levine”

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N. Dash: More enervating than edgy

Contributed by Curtis Mitchell / The moment of entering a gallery opening – bright lights, convivial conversation, and walls and floor partially seen through conjoined bodies – is not conducive to thoughtful viewing. N. Dash’s paintings recently on display at Casey Kaplan, with their radically blown-up images of nubs of fabric and other household remnants, … read more… “N. Dash: More enervating than edgy”

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Hermine Ford’s exquisite poise

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / Any painter is eclectic to a greater or lesser degree, drawing inspiration from other painters, but it’s a rarer one who successfully processes multiple discrete influences into distinctive art all her own. Hermine Ford is emphatically such a painter. Her discursively shaped paintings currently on view at the New York … read more… “Hermine Ford’s exquisite poise”

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Pat Passlof: At the apex of a leap

Contributed by Jason Andrew / This is first of three posts by Jason Andrew that discuss the work of Pat Passlof; the post takes a look at the survey curated by Karen Wilkin at the Milton Resnick and Pat Passlof Foundation, on view October 11, 2019 – April 2020; the second will examine the exhibition … read more… “Pat Passlof: At the apex of a leap”

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ICYMI: Elizabeth Hazan

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Elizabeth Hazan’s earlier paintings were highly resolved meditations on Google map imagery and aerial landscape views of Long Island’s east end. The terrific new work, recently on display at Johnannes Vogt in a solo show called “Heat Wave,” is moving into a less certain, but, for me, more satisfying state … read more… “ICYMI: Elizabeth Hazan”

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Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: November 2019

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Hello November! There are plenty of shows opening this month, and today (November 15) is also the fifteenth day of the 2019 Two Coats of Paint year-end fundraising campaign. This year we’re requesting funding to continue our work supporting artists and arts organizations through 2020. You might think of your … read more… “Two Coats Selected Gallery Guide: November 2019”

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Hello Instagram: Angela Lane in Berlin

Contributed by Giovanni Garcia-Fenech / I initially resisted Instagram, dismissing it as a repository of selfies, sunsets, and celebrities, but, soured by Facebook and Twitter, I finally joined. Over the past four years I’ve come to appreciate IG for introducing me to a lot of terrific artists, many of whom never show their work in … read more… “Hello Instagram: Angela Lane in Berlin”

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Art and Film: Joker is the wrong movie

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / Joker, Todd Phillips’ tensely anticipated origin story of the Batman villain that grossed $96 million in its first weekend, self-consciously presents as Taxi Driver meets The King of Comedy, and a kind of atavistic essay on the perils of inequality and the dominance of the one percent. Like many high-concept films, however, … read more… “Art and Film: Joker is the wrong movie”

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Looking back: Richard Baker at Tibor de Nagy

Contributed by Sharon Butler / Last month, seeing Richard Baker’s paintings from the 80s and 90s at Tibor de Nagy took me back to my early days in New York. I had arrived in Soho in 1987 after finishing a two-year stint studying painting at MassArt in Boston, where I made modest surface-oriented abstractions. In New York, … read more… “Looking back: Richard Baker at Tibor de Nagy”

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