Collaboration: Archie Rand and Bill Berkson

Before poet and art critic Bill Berkson died earlier this month, he had been collaborating with artist Archie Rand on a re-working of “Room Tone,” a poem from Berkson’s 2014 volume Expect Delays, published by Coffee House Press. “Each line of the poem is given a visual matrix that produces a synapse,” Rand explained in … read more… “Collaboration: Archie Rand and Bill Berkson”

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Neighbors: Marci MacGuffie @ 55 Washington

For artists who spend long hours working alone in the studio, the conversations that take place in the hallway with other artists are crucial. For the past 18 months, I’ve been fortunate to share my hallway with Marci MacGuffie, an artist known for her large-scale installations and participatory projects. Last week, MacGuffie invited me into … read more… “Neighbors: Marci MacGuffie @ 55 Washington”

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Men curating women

Last week “The Female Gaze, Part 2: Women Look At Men,” an exhibition that includes many rich and inventive paintings, opened at Cheim and Read. The first edition, “The Female Gaze: Women Look at Women,” took place in 2009, and the new installment, featuring work by 32 women who depict men, focuses on gender and … read more… “Men curating women”

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Studio visit with Greg Drasler

Visiting an artist’s studio before a new body of work is packed and shipped off for a solo show can be a stirring experience. The artist is anxious, perhaps, but by the same token brimming with anticipation and eager to discuss the new paintings and explain the process and ideas behind the work. A few … read more… “Studio visit with Greg Drasler”

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Street Smarts: Charles Goldman @ Songs For Presidents

Guest Contributor Mary Addison Hackett / I went to graduate school in Chicago with Charles Goldman and still remember one of the first pieces he showed at a crit. It was a thin red line cut from paper, crossing the gallery floor. If I recall correctly, it represented the interstate highway he had driven from … read more… “Street Smarts: Charles Goldman @ Songs For Presidents”

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Nicole Eisenman and the triumph of painting

Contributed by Jonathan Stevenson / Just about every piece in Nicole Eisenman’s nobly minatory exhibition “Al-ugh-ories” at the New Museum, up through June 26, pulses with aesthetic energy, turbocharged by a peripatetic erudition that darts assuredly from one caustic historical (sometimes art-historical) reference point to another. The artist is centrally, though not exclusively, concerned with … read more… “Nicole Eisenman and the triumph of painting”

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Quick study

This week: Coney Art Walls, job postings, Art Basel report, painterly photographs, residency news from Sharpe Walentas and the Elizabeth Foundation Studio Program (residents announced and juries revealed), a new residency program in the Arctic, an unknown Modigliani discovered (maybe), an interview with Françoise Gilot, the painter and mother of Picasso’s kids, on the occasion … read more… “Quick study”

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Chicago: Adam Scott at Julius Caesar

Contributed by Robin Dluzen / Adam Scott’s latest exhibition, “Silent Running” at Julius Caesar in Chicago, is a kind of Helen-Frankenthaler-color-field-painting-meets-Gram-Parsons-desert-pilgrimage experience. The works are arguably Scott’s most pared-down and abstract to date, devoid of all but a suggestion of the representational. The artist fills each canvas, edge-to-edge, with his signature poured acrylic. The all-over … read more… “Chicago: Adam Scott at Julius Caesar”

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Rethinking Howard Hodgkin

For decades, Howard Hodgkin (b. 1932, London) has been known for turning his memories and experiences into brushy, colorful paintings on old wooden panels. He is a painter I’d always wanted to love, but I had never fully understood or been moved by his chunky brushwork and vivid color. The way he slapped the paint … read more… “Rethinking Howard Hodgkin”

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Storage or dumpster? Organizing the archives

Readers who have been following Two Coats of Paint since the beginning know that for ten years I taught at a state university in Connecticut and kept my studio in the attic of an old Victorian house in downtown Mystic. In 2010 I moved back to New York and, after commuting for a few semesters … read more… “Storage or dumpster? Organizing the archives”

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