Bushwick Open Studios 2017– from Bogart to Troutman

Carlo D’Anselmi at David & Schweitzer annex

Contributed by William Eckhardt Kohler / The printed studio maps were already gone by early Saturday afternoon–a good indication of the popularity of Bushwick Open Studios–so I simply started at 56 Bogart and made my way to 17-17 Troutman, stopping at studios I found along the way. In open-studio walks, the art inevitably ranges wildly from undeveloped and amateurish stuff to wonderfully revelatory discoveries of accomplished artists toiling in relative obscurity. And the studios themselves run the gamut from chaotic nooks to manicured spaces to curated gallery-quality exhibits. By no means comprehensive, this accounting includes what I came across that most excited me in four hours plus.

56 Bogart Street

David & Schweitzer annex– “True Believers,” curated by Daniel John Gadd. In heavily populated group shows, boundaries can blur and there is often not enough space to really read a piece. Even so, a few really jumped out.

Ben Pritchard, Two Triangles
Elisa Jensen, Creature In The Cave
Jason Rohlf, Praised
Paul Behnke, Agamemnon
Zachary Keeting, Dove Tumbles

Eric Simmons is painter whose work I can’t recall seeing and a pleasant surprise. He shuttles between collage and painting, and it appears the collages may serve as working models for the paintings. Elements of traditional painting are fused with a sweetly anarchic streak.

Eric Simmons
Eric Simmons
Eric Simmons
Eric Simmons
Eric Simmons
Eric Simmons

Amanda Rose Hunter. I’m a fan of the down-tempo, and these modest and somewhat scruffy collages fall into that category. They are simple, sly and inventive. I’m looking forward to seeing more from this artist.

Amanda Rose Hunter
Amanda Rose Hunter
Amanda Rose Hunter
Amanda Rose Hunter

And on my way to 17-17 Troutman, I encountered the work of Emilia Olsen. Henri Rousseau meets Florine Stettheimer in the house of Ensor.

Emilia Olsen

One of my favorite conversations of the day was with Nils Karsten. In his main studio, a kind of square box with tall ceilings, were his woodblocks–both the abstraction shown here and large prints of vintage punk album covers. Upstairs via a little loft ladder was the artist’s collage work: intuitive pedagogical clippings sourced from various media, arranged along a grid.

Nils Karsten, flatfile
Nils Karsten
Nils Karsten
Nils Karsten

Ann McCoy and Jeff Lewis were in a small group show at Becky Kinder’s studio. It was treat to see McCoy’s work as it seems like years since I’ve had the pleasure. Jeff Lewis completed the mystical vibe.

Ann McCoy
Jeff Lewis

And more from along the way:

Julie Torres in “Painting in a Post-Factual World,” curated by Albert Weaver and Josh Mitchell at 449 Troutman.
Bonnie Leibowitz in “Painting in a Post-Factual World,” curated by Albert Weaver and Josh Mitchell at 449 Troutman.
Joey Parlett
Joey Parlett

17-17 Troutman

Another enjoyable conversation was had with Johnny Mullen. These are block print paintings, using enamel house paint and rigid insulation board as the printing blocks.

Johnny Mullen
Johnny Mullen
Johnny Mullen
Zach Ziemann, Communion
Tim Campbell, Flaming Alphabet
Lauren Allegrezza

I ended the evening with a handful of the always engaging Meg Lipke. I’m enjoying how she is focusing and expanding her playfully enigmatic and allusive sculpture/painting hybrids.

Meg Lipke
Meg Lipke
Meg Lipke

Bushwick Open Studios 2017, organized by Arts in Bushwick. Throughout the Bushwick neighborhood of Brooklyn, NY. September 23 & 24, 2017.

About the author: A graduate of the Maryland Art Institute, Willie Kohler is a painter who works in Long Island City and is represented by Linda Warren Projects in Chicago. He is a regular contributor to the arts section at HuffPost.

Related posts:
Quick study: New Year’s edition with Honeycutt, Winkleman, Viveros-Fauné, Schor, Twitter, and Kohler
SURVEY: Bleaching, staining, and dyeing
Brooklyn Museum Go: Bushwick short list

Two Coats of Paint is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution – Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. To use content beyond the scope of this license, permission is required.

Tags: , ,

7 thoughts on “Bushwick Open Studios 2017– from Bogart to Troutman”

Leave a Reply to Garrett Chingery Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *