Quote: Kerry James Marshall

Kerry James Marshall
Kerry James Marshall, Vignette (Wishing Well), 2010, acrylic and glitter on PVC panel.

“I don’t believe in hope,” Kerry James Marshall said in a recent interview with Wyatt Mason in the NYTimes. “I believe in action. If I’m an apostle of anything: There are always going to be complications, but to a large degree, everything is in your hands.” For students and young painters questioning the importance of painting during these dark days of Trump, Marshall’s endeavor proves that art can be political, personal, and painterly.  His unstretched, mural-sized canvases that depict the lives and history of black Americans are generally addressed on a political and historical level, but his painting chops are just as remarkable. A retrospective of his work, including some recent abstract paintings, is on view through January 29 at the Met Breuer. Don’t miss it.

Kerry James Marshall
Kerry James Marshall, Untitled (Mirror Girl), 2014, acrylic on PVC panel.
Kerry James Marshall
Kerry James Marshall, De Style, 1993, acrylic and collage on paper.
Kerry James Marshall
Kerry James Marshall, Untitled (Vignette), 2012, acrylic and glitter on PVC panel.
Kerry James Marshall
Kerry James Marshall, Bang, 1994, acrylic and collage on canvas.
Kerry James Marshall
Kerry James Marshall, Black Star 2, 2012, acrylic on PVC panel.
Kerry James Marshall
Kerry James Marshall, Could This Be Love, 1992, acrylic and collage on canvas.
Kerry James Marshall
Kerry James Marshall, Untitled, 2008, acrylic on fiberglass.
Kerry James Marshall
Kerry James Marshall, Slow Dance, 1992-1993, acrylic and collage on canvas.
Kerry James Marshall
Kerry James Marshall, The Lost Boys, 1993, acrylic and collage on canvas.
Kerry James Marshall
Kerry James Marshall, They Know that I Know, 1992, acrylic and collage on canvas.
Kerry James Marshall
Kerry James Marshall, Untitled (Beach Towel), 2014, acrylic on PVC panel.

“Kerry James Marshall: Mastry,” curated by Ian Alteveer. The Met Breuer, Upper East Side, New York, NY. Through January 29, 2017.

Related posts:
Gentrification: Can artists flip Congressional Districts?
Political violence and abstraction: Suzanne McClelland
William Blake: Promulgating his paeans to political revolution and Anglican apostasy

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