April 29, 2014

The view from here

Staying in  Culver City for a few days, overlooking the 405, I couldn't have asked for a more compelling view. I always forget how much I love Los Angeles.
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Two Coats of Paint is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. For permission to use content beyond the scope of this license, permission is required.

Images: Austin Thomas

 Austin Thomas, Be Nice to Everybody, 2014, print on paper, small scale.

Thomas has work included in the star-studded "Seven Year Anniversary Group Show" at English Kills, one of the first galleries in Bushwick.

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Two Coats of Paint is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. For permission to use content beyond the scope of this license, permission is required.

April 28, 2014

Cosmic wit at Centotto


Paul D’Agostino’s Bushwick gallery Centotto is an intimate space, presenting itself like the drawing room of an especially erudite and charmingly uncynical hipster. In the gallery’s clever group show “Vapors and Squalls, or Mediums,” comprising work by Kate Teale, Karen Marston, Jonathan Quinn, and Wendy Klemperer, D'Agostino has arrayed paintings depicting water in various forms of tumult with sculptures of animals, writhing as if in anticipation of impending storms. Also part of the show are weather-related texts drawn from great authors – Coleridge, Conrad, and Melville, for instance – by each of the artists as well as the gallerist.

April 22, 2014

Message to the MFA class of 2014


This year I curated "Possible as a Pair of Shoes," the Brooklyn College MFA thesis exhibition, which opens this Friday at Show Room in Gowanus. On Saturday, May 3, 3-6 pm, I'll be hosting a Curator's Afternoon at the gallery, so please stop by and join the conversation. The exhibition title is borrowed from "Description," a 2012 poem by Christopher Stackhouse:

April 22: Andrew Ginzel's list of NYC shows and events

SOME but not all NYC SELECTED SHOWS TO SEE / April 22, 2014  / Listed south to north. Compiled by artist Andrew Ginzel for his students at the School of Visual Arts. Note: Images have been selected by Two Coats of Paint.

Annie Lapin in "Dee Ferris, Barnaby Furnas, Annie Lapin" @ Sargent's Daughters

Video: Julian Schnabel, painting en plein air


"View of Dawn in the Tropics," an exhibition of Julian Schnabel's paintings, made from 1989-90, never seen in NYC, is on view at Gagosian (Chelsea) through the end of May. The following video has great footage of Schnabel making mammoth paintings at his outdoor studio on Montauk. Definitely worth watching.

April 21, 2014

Art and Social Media Symposium @ CSU Long Beach, April 27

Please join us for an Art and Social Media Symposium organized by Marie Thibeault at California State University Long Beach, Sunday, April 27. I'll give a lecture at 2pm, followed by a panel discussion featuring Julia Schwartz, Doug Harvey, Kio Griffith, Grant Vetter, and moderated by Dane Klingaman. The event, which also includes MFA Open Studios and five gallery openings across campus, is sponsored by the Painting and Drawing Program. Should be fun.


For the panel discussion I contributed a couple questions:

1. I've often said that Twitter is the new smoking--instead of taking a cigarette break, I step back from a painting and check Twitter. How has social networking media changed the way we approach work in the studio and gallery? If we post an image of recent work and don't get any "thumbs up," are we more likely to alter the project or painting?

2. As longtime users of web 2.0 tools, do the other panelists ever feel as though the 24/7 nature of technology may be taking over their lives? Is the internet addictive? Do they put limits on the amount of time they spend online? Or is FOMO (Fear of Missing Out) too great to put limits on usage? Can panelists foresee a time when they might step away from the computer?

Any thoughts?

If you are in LA, I hope to see you there.

[Image: The poster features one of my old paintings from 2009]

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Two Coats of Paint is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. For permission to use content beyond the scope of this license, permission is required.

April 17, 2014

Responses to "Zombie Formalism"


 My last post precipitated several comments about Walter Robinson's term "Zombie Formalism" and about the type of work discussed, as well as some offline discussion about labeling art movements in general. In an age supposedly marked by an inclusive, anything-goes pluralism, the arguments sparked by recent approaches to painting reveal that our "pluralistic" era isn't without acrimony.

[Image above: Andy Boot, Untitled (blue), 2012, Rhythmic gymnastic ribbon, wax, frame, 100 x 70 cm.]

April 14, 2014

Speculating on Andy Boot and Zombie Formalism


A few weeks ago, Cary Smith sent me an email with a link to Australian artist Andy Boot's work. A scroll through his page on the Croy Nielsen website reveals how the Casualist approach can serve a transitional purpose for individual artists. Boot made loosely stretched canvas pieces back in 2008, but by 2013 had begun making freestanding objects out of wood and metal. Now he seems to have returned to a more minimal painting approach -- albeit with more traditional supports -- applying small squiggly watercolor lines to mostly empty canvas. Perhaps this reversion to custom indicates an engagement with the art market's embrace of what Walter Robinson, writing at Artspace, recently dubbed "Zombie Formalism."

[Image above: Andy Boot, Reasons to Buy in Bulk, 2008, oil, acrylic, markers, and canvas on wood. Image courtesy of Croy Nielsen.]

April 10, 2014

IMAGES: John O'Donnell considers mimesis


It's hard to tell if John O'Donnell is serious, and he seems to want it that way. Although known for his outlandish performances and kitschy installations that riff on contemporary art making strategies, in a recent show at The Schumacher Gallery at Westover School, O'Donnell presented a series of small paintings that explored contemporary abstraction. His process involved making small studies comprising paint and found objects like pizza boxes and kids' toys, and using the collage-like objects as reference points for a series of paintings made on burlap panels that he purchased from a local arts and crafts store. In the exhibition, he hung the subjects and the paintings side by side.

April 8, 2014

April 8: Andrew Ginzel's list of NYC shows and events

SOME but not all NYC SELECTED SHOWS TO SEE / April 8, 2014  / Listed south to north. Compiled by artist Andrew Ginzel for his students at the School of Visual Arts. Note: Images have been selected by Two Coats of Paint.

 Rochelle Feinstein @ On Stellar Rays

Who is teenage Donna? Robert Yoder @ Frosch & Portmann

TEENAGE DONNA, Seattle artist Robert Yoder's latest solo at Frosch & Portmann, opens on Thursday. His new paintings, more dense than previous drawings and paper collages, are rendered on solitary, well-worn canvases, and the press release reads like a page torn from a teenager's long lost diary:

April 4, 2014

PRINTMAKING: Sylvan Lionni at Kansas


As a resident artist at Counterproof Press at the University of Connecticut this semester, I've begun to notice how many painters incorporate traditional printmaking processes and strategies into their work. Recently we saw Christopher Wool's retrospective at the Guggenheim, and now Sylvan Lionni's solo show at Kansas; both reflect the extensive use of screen printing.

[Image above: Sylvan Lionni, Rulers, 2014, acrylic and urethane on steel, 48 x 44 inches.]

April 3, 2014

Liam Everett’s unmooring machinations


Guest contributor Jonathan Stevenson / Liam Everett’s large paintings – on display in his show “Montolieu” at On Stellar Rays – are insidiously provocative. At first glance they just look unevenly worn and washed-out, perhaps casualist or aimed to simulate relics that might be found on the walls of an abandoned cathedral or museum. Then it becomes clear that Everett is after neither the agitation of the provisional nor the security of any clear historical referent.

[Image at top:  Liam Everett, Untitled (Larrun), 2013, acrylic, oil, salt and alcohol on primed linen
77 x 54-1/4 inches.]