It’s good to be lonely: Jason Tomme at Theodore:Art

Stephanie Theodore gets the prize for press release of the day for her five deceptively simple takes on Jason Tomme’s exhibition. The show is a compelling mix of different media, from wood and stone sculptures and found objects to finely detailed pencil drawings, which I can imagine the artist making alone, in his studio, contemplating art’s need for solitude, all the while longing for human companionship and conversation. We can all relate to that.

[Jason Tomme, Crack Painting September 2014, 2014, oil on linen, 24 x 18 inches.]

Jason Tomme, installation view at Theodore:Art.

Here’s the  meat of the PR text.

Take One: Charlie writes to Charles of the “undeniable beauty” and “lingering disquiet” of the “strange kingless space” in which he finds himself. Like the damp, debris-strewn rooms at the center of Andrei Tarkovsky’s films, this uneasy place seems an illusory realm beyond the veil of appearances.


Take Two: It’s good to be lonely. Really, it’s fine.

Take Three: When a loved one passes, the heart goes kablooey.

Take Four: Donald Rumsfeld hit the nail on the head when he spoke about “Known Unknowns”.

Take Five: Drawing, painting, sculpture splayed into a single room. A series of meticulous graphite drawings of potted plants, a new painting from the ongoing series “Crack Paintings”, and a myriad of new sculpture serve as wondrous artifacts to an inquisitive look at solitude, imagination, and location.

 Jason Tomme, Untitled Object # 2, (detail) 2014; OSB, stone, acrylic paint, 3-D printed composite.

Jason Tomme, Potted Plants: When Sunshine, 2014; graphite on paper – paper size: 50 x 38 inches. 
Jason Tomme: in a desert, on and island, in a room,” Theodore:Art, Bushwick, Brooklyn, NY. Through October 19, 2014.

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Two Coats of Paint is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution – Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. For permission to use content beyond the scope of this license, permission is required.

Two Coats of Paint is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution – Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. To use content beyond the scope of this license, permission is required.

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