April 12, 2013

Quick study: Waltemath, Gatson, Kennedy, a few opportunities, and lots of links


If you're in the northwest, check out "Latencies," an exhibition of Joan Waltemath's sublime abstract paintings at Elizabeth Leach in Portland, OR, through April 27, 2013. Using interference pigments and graphite, Waltemath creates seductive surfaces on body-sized panels that both reflect and absorb, changing as you move around the space.

Image above: Joan Waltemath, your thoughts being said (East Above), oil, graphite, zinc and florescent pigment on honeycomb aluminum panel, 38.5 x 17.25 inches.

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Peter Schjeldahl on the Met's new trove of Cubist work:
The seventy-eight items won’t only turn the Met from a whistle stop into a Grand Central of early-twentieth-century art, it will almost certainly spark a general revaluation, in all ways, of the most consequential and least seductive modern-art movement....Are you excited? I’m excited.
Yes, me too.

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"Concrete Abstract" on view through April 20 at Heiner Contemporary in Georgetown, Washington, DC, explores the "confluence of abstraction with the everyday."  Curated by Matthew Smith, artists include Seth Adelsberger, Lisa Dillin, Jeremy Flick, Steven Frost, Sue Johnson, Becca Kallem, Patrick McDonough, Danielle Mysliwiec and Matthew Smith. Image above: Danielle Mysliwiec, Crow's Nest, 2013, oil on panel, 18 x 18 inches.

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University College Ghent / School of Arts is looking for two full-time artistic assistants. "Remuneration according to wage scale 508 (indexed monthly gross starting salary for a full-time employment: 2.452,26 € without seniority, and 4.128,57 € in case of 25 years of seniority)." I don't know what this means, but only applications filed on time will be considered.  Click here for more details.

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Continuing the discussion of the role galleries play in contemporary art, guest editor David Carrier asked writers at The Brooklyn Rail to describe "memorable galleries, discussions of their politics and history, and anecdotal personal accounts." On my list of things to read.

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STEP UP is a series of six solo exhibitions at Real Art Ways in Hartford, CT, open to emerging artists living in New York, New Jersey or New England. Online submission, deadline is May 2013. I'll be on the jury with Carl E. Hazlewood, Curator, Writer, Artist and co-founder of Aljira, a Center for Contemporary Art in Newark, NJ, and Denise Markonish, Curator at MASS MoCA in North Adams, MA. I hope a few [what's a better way to say it than kick-ass?] painters apply. Click here for more information.

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Exploring themes of surface and female power, Alison Kennedy's solo show, "Marie Antoinette," is on view at The Substation in Melbourne, Australia, through May 12, 2013. Image above: Alison Kennedy, Wrckd Medusa, 2013, acrylic on canvas. I'd go if I were in Melbourne.


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This week the James Kalm Report covers "The Promise of Light,"  Rico Gatson's show at Ronald Feldman. Gatson's blend of cool minimal object-making with glitter, asphalt, African textile patterns and personal history never disappoints."The Promise of Light is partly inspired by the book, The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson, which chronicles the black migration out of the American South spanning World War I through the early 1970’s. Gatson’s family undertook this journey, moving from Georgia to California in the late 60’s for the promise of a new beginning. The 'promise' is a reference to the intrinsic optimism of the distinctive California light, while alternately referencing the universal struggle inherent in striving toward idealized promise."



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GOOD NEWS: Jacket 2 Reissues, known for producing fully searchable facsimile PDF editions of out-of-print articles and journals of and about poetry, has recently published the influential art journal edited by Susan Bee and Mira Schor from 1986-1996. All twenty issues of M/E/A/N/I/N/G are now in PDF format and available online.



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When I went to see the huge Basquiat exhibiton at Gagosian a few weeks ago, I overheard so many people talking nostalgically about the first time they saw his work. If you missed the show, you can check out the Gagosian website, but the rawness of the paint handling doesn't really translate. He was brilliant, don't you think? Above: Jean-Michel Basquiat, In Italian, 1983, acrylic and oil paintstick on canvas with wooden supports and five smaller canvases painted with ink marker. 88 1/2 x 80 inches. © The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat/ADAGP, Paris, ARS, New York 2013.

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And if you're in Dallas, definitely check out the big art fair this weekend--everyone will be there.

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Related posts:
Exchanging studio visits with Joan Waltemath
Rico Gatson's new paintings at Exit Art
Free reading: M/E/A/N/I/N/G: A Journal of Contemporary Art Issues

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