EMAIL: A note to Mira Schor

Inspired by Raphael Rubinstein’s approach to the Artseen section of The Brooklyn Rail, EMAIL is a new section featuring short posts based on notes written to other artists.

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Hi Mira,

I stopped by your show
on Saturday and particularly love the white
painting on the wall near the office: esp. the relative chalkiness of
the paint, the
visible decision-making around the feet, and the whoosh of..whatever
that is (!) going through the windows. The tension between text and image as well as the small scale successfully address the urge to make work that’s
personal, political and conceptual (all at once) that you talked about during your lecture at American University. Sometimes words,
especially for writer-artists, are so important to the process, they
can’t be eliminated–even in a medium as visual as painting. But,
interestingly, I find the pieces with faint or no text the most compelling…and
yet, they need to be seen alongside the text-ier ones for the lightness (and absence) to be as powerful. That
thin, yellow-y tracing paper is a perfect choice for the ink
studies in the backroom–the flimsiness is intriguing…and lovely. Congratulations on a fine
show. But perhaps I should be posting this to the blog…?

Anyway, please tell your students I enjoyed visiting their studios on Friday–thanks for the invitation. I will print and sign the PDF and put it in the mail today or tomorrow.

All best,
Sharon

  Mira Schor, Negative of the Positive, 2012, nk, graphite, and gesso on linen,
24 x 28 inches.

 Mira Schor, The Porous Wall, 2012, oil on linen, 18 x 30 inches.


Mira Schor, This is the Future, 2012, oil on linen, 24 x 28 inches.

Mira Schor, installation of drawings on paper, Marvelli Gallery.

Mira Schor, My Dreams Are Emptied Out, 2011, ink, rabbit skin glue, and gesso on
white linen, 12 x 16 inches

Mira Schor: Voice and Speech,” Marvelli Gallery, New York, NY. Through April 28, 2012.

Related blog: Letters of Note
Letters of Note posts letters,
postcards, telegrams, faxes, and memos, usually written by notable people, everyday. Always amusing to read.

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