July 27, 2011

At home amid the ruins: Eva Struble at Lombard Freid

Eva Struble, "Admiral's Row 3," 2011, oil on canvas, 64.8 x 71.1 cm

Eva Struble's third solo at Lombard Freid Projects features paintings of the architectural ruins in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Using vivid color and layered, translucent textures, Struble breaks down the realism of her reference images, creating a brassy surrealism. In Time Out New York Paul Laster writes that Struble's drips, pours and masking reinforce the man-made nature of the debris-strewn environments she depicts, creating vibrant images that exist in a metaphysical realm.

 
Eva Struble, "Navy Yard," 2011, oil on canvas, 60 x 78"

In the L Magazine Benjamin Sutton suggests that Struble's "dazzling palette of neons and push these disintegrating structures towards surrealism and abstraction. In 'Navy Yard' (2011), one of the Brooklyn Navy Yard's dry docks sits empty, its sides glowing a spectacular sunset red under a small splotch of green sky. At the bottom of the dock, an unseen crane is reflected in stagnant waters, an apparent mirage or magical glimpse of the long-crumbled steel tower. The space seems otherwordly, yet the sight of water and ominous skies hint at the landscape beyond. It's Giorgio de Chirico on acid meets post-apocalyptic Le Douanier Rousseau by way of Andrew Moore's monumental, melancholy photographs—encounters between cities and resilient environments as painted by Deborah Brown and William Swanson also come to mind."


 
Eva Struble, "Shell Pyramids," 2011, oil on canvas, 38 x 54"

Eva Struble, "Laying Keel," 2011, oil on canvas, 38 x 54"

"Eva Struble: Landsmen," Lombard Freid Projects, New York, NY. Through July 29, 2011.

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