December 19, 2010

2010: The girls are all right

Keltie Ferris, ooooOOO()()()," 2010, oil, acrylic, oil pastel & sprayed paint on canvas, 100x80"

Klara Lidén,"Toujours Être Ailleurs (Always To Be Elsewhere)," 2010, (detail), mixed media. Photograph: Arno Gisinger, image courtesy of Jeu de Paume, Paris © 2010 Klara Lidén

Adrian Piper, "Past Time: Selected Works 1973 - 1995," installation view

According to Roberta Smith in her year-end overview, one of the bright spots of 2010 was the visibility of female artists. "In the scrum of exhibitions surrounding the Frieze Art Fair in London, the small survey of Klara Lidens architectural interventions and re-creations at the Serpentine Gallery, the forward-looking alternative space in Regent’s Park, was a standout. Back in New York a newly refurbished Artists Space showed work by the overlooked German Minimalist Charlotte Posenenske; and the Elizabeth Dee Gallery rented a floor of the building formerly known as the Dia Center for the Arts to amount a spacious Dia-like survey of the work of the influential Conceptual artist Adrian Piper.

Maria Harriet Elizabeth Cator (English, d. 1881), untitled page from the Cator Album, late 1860s/70s, collage of watercolor and albumen silver prints; 10 7/8 x 8 1/2," Hans P. Kraus, Jr., New York

At the Metropolitan Museum of Art the exhibition “Playing With Pictures: The Art of Victorian Photocollage” proposed that the onset of collage be moved back nearly half a century and across the English Channel, out of the studios of the Cubists and into the drawing-rooms of upper-class British women making tableaus from cut-up photographs. At the Modern “On Line: Drawing Through the Twentieth Century” teems with work by little-known or under-shown women.

Faith Ringgold installation at the Neuberger Museum

The Neuberger Museum or Art in Purchase, N.Y., resurrected Faith Ringgold’s staunch early paintings, and the Brooklyn Museum added a roster of women to the history of Pop Art. And in New York galleries substantial shows by women have been abundant, including those by newcomers like Liz Magic Laser, Shio Kusaka, Keltie Ferris and Tatiana Trouvé, as well as better-known artists like Sarah Sze, Anya Kielar, Huma Bhabha, Claire Pentecost, Rineke Dijkstra, Mika Rottenberg, Siobhan Liddell, Pipilotti Rist and Joan Snyder. Diverse in age, style and medium, the girls are all right, and getting better all the time. Too bad they don’t run Washington yet."

At the Brooklyn Museum: Kiki Kogelnik (Austrian, 1935–1997), "Astronaut," 1964, oil and acrylic on canvas, 79 x 55," Kiki Kogelnik Foundation, Vienna and New York

4 comments:

is this a Faith Ringgold painting or whose? I cannot find the ptg on her website and it is very different from her other work.

thanks,

Patricia Cole

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_ev4ahhlEL5Y/TJeI3IytrZI/AAAAAAAADIg/SJQGOzpCboM/s1600/faith+birdie+in+front+of+die.jpg

it's a picture of the opening from Ringgold's blog.

Klara Lidén's stack of color tucked away looks great. I wonder if they had to build the doorway like that for the work. Seems like a lot of fuss. But it looks really good... maybe there's something about blocking passage and drawing attention... I find that at parties I like to stand in the doorframes between rooms so that I always have a reason to chat with people as they go by...

I'm so glad the Brooklyn Museum added women to their history of pop art . We often forget how influential women were and are on the pop art movement.