October 14, 2009

Yigal Ozeri's paintings

Matthew Bourbon writes in ArtForum that Yigal Ozeri's paintings of young girls may be problematic conceptually, but they're somewhat redeemed by his sensitive paint handling. "Taking a page from Carl Jung’s theories on the feminine 'anima,' [fond memories of Prof. Bill Parker and grad school just came flooding back --Ed.] Yigal Ozeri approaches realism as a means to project his own thoughts into the interior lives of several young women. In a recent interview, he stated that he befriended the women depicted in his works because they live off the grid, and his fascination with the substance of their lives enticed him to portray a 'new generation.'

"As problematic as Ozeri’s psychological transposition into the minds of his subjects may seem, the technical prowess in his intricate paintings occasionally mitigates the overt conceptual faults of his project. Still, from a distance, Ozeri’s works on paper appear too familiar. They mimic the look of soft-core porn images of female nudes gallivanting through nature, as well as Justine Kurland’s earnest photographs of young girls as bathers, first seen in the 1999 group show 'Another Girl, Another Planet.' While Kurland’s images posit a slightly Arcadian freedom from the travails of maturing from girlhood to womanhood, Ozeri’s paintings feel closer to the model-as-muse paradigm, where obsession with a young, albeit atypical, female is portrayed for consumption.

"If one is able to temporarily forgive the failures of Ozeri’s subject, close examination of his paintings reveal sensitive and sometimes beautiful renderings of light effects and physical surfaces. Still, the Andrew Wyeth–like references, as well as the digital sources Ozeri manipulates to create his art, ultimately undercut the sense of knowing these women. The artist’s attachment to a photographic notion of 'reality' does not make his subjects more particular, just more anonymous."

"Yigal Ozeri: Desire for Anima," Mike Weiss Gallery, New York, NY. Through Oct. 24, 2009.

"Justine Kurland, This Train is Bound for Glory," Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York, NY. October 15 - November 14, 2009.

6 comments:

I was reminded more of 70s British sleaze, David Hamilotn than Kurland.

But I'm not seeing any actual nudes here, Sharon.

Art should be critiqued on the basis of artistic concepts, not political correctness. You imposition of other "overt conceptual faults" is Fascist and reminiscent of the Nazis. Art does not exist to serve or further your political goals.

"I was reminded more of 70s British sleaze, David Hamilotn (sic) than Kurland."
David Hamilton is one of the most successful art photographers in history. His books have sold millions of copies.

"But I'm not seeing any actual nudes here, Sharon." God forbid. If they were young boys you'd probably be all over it

The fact that you don't know these are photos with paint by numbers technique on top baffles my mind ... Hello people lets raise the bar just a little bit

The fact that you don't know these are photos with paint by numbers technique on top baffles my mind ... Hello people lets raise the bar just a little bit

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