September 12, 2009

NY Times Art in Review: Anderson and Auerbach

Hurvin Anderson "Peter's Sitters 3," 2009, oil on canvas, 187 x 147 cm

"Hurvin Anderson: Peter’s Series 2007-2009," Studio Museum in Harlem. Through Oct. 25. Roberta Smith: The deft oil paintings of Hurvin Anderson, born in England in 1965, fall within a familiar genre of architectural interiors that play it both ways: they combine the cozy details of everyday life with various geometries and paint textures that verge on the abstract. The results are capable but also familiar, and too clearly based on photographs.



Tauba Auerbach, "Crumple VI," 2009 Acrylic and inkjet on canvas, 96 x 128 inches, 243.8 x 325.1 cm (Installation image above by photographer Adam Reich).

"Tauba Auerbach: Here and Now/And Nowhere,"Deitch Projects. Through Oct. 17. Ken Johnson: Tauba Auerbach has done remarkable things with typography and calligraphy, and her dazzling, trompe l’oeil, Op Art dot paintings have been turning up in shows around town, including “Younger Than Jesus” at the New Museum. The two large canvases in this beautiful exhibition at Deitch look like giant sheets of slightly crumpled paper from a distance; up close they atomize into buzzing fields of black spots on white ground. For another series it looks as if she has simply stretched large pieces of creased and wrinkled monochromatic fabric. Examine the works’ surfaces closely and you find that they are perfectly flat, the apparent deformations skillfully spray-painted on. A set of large color photographs of television-screen static is less interesting, though the idea of earthbound technology receiving ambient cosmic energy could be philosophically intriguing. It’s amazing that Ms. Auerbach is not yet 30. She seems a bit scattered now, but in a fertile way. Her future looks very bright.

Read entire column here.

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